10 things to know about B.C.’s redesigned school curriculum

As students in Lake Country head back to the class, here's some things to learn about the redesigned school curriculum

With students heading back to school

With school kids back in session and a new curriculum being brought in for students in kindergarten to Grade 9 this year, parents might be wondering what the redesigned curriculum entails.

For the past few years, the Ministry of Education has partnered with teachers and education experts to develop a new curriculum that will make sure British Columbia’s students and education system remains a global leader.

Today is back-to-school throughout the province. It’s also the start of the second year of a three-year process of phasing in the new curriculum.

This year the new curriculum will come alive in every kindergarten to Grade 9 class around the province, while draft Grade 10 to 12 curriculum is available to teachers for their feedback and optional use in classrooms.

Here are the 10 things you need to know about B.C.’s new curriculum:

1. The basics of reading, writing and math remain at the heart of the education system. Students will learn – and be tested – on these core skills needed to succeed in university, in the workforce and in life.

2. Tomorrow’s skills today – collaboration, critical thinking, and communications. New curriculum is designed so students learn these skills – which are exactly what post-secondary institutions and employers say they need.

3. New curriculum builds on success. British Columbia has rising graduation rates and some of the best learning outcomes in the world – and the Province is building on this so B.C.’s kids keep succeeding.

4. The focus is on concepts. Students will understand and work with the big ideas, rather than simply memorizing the facts.

5. In this together. B.C.’s new curriculum was developed in consultation with more than 200 teachers nominated by the BC Teachers’ Federation, the Federation of Independent School Associations and First Nations Schools Association. Together, global best practices were looked at.

6. Coding is coming for all students. Coding is a path to careers in the booming tech sector – and it teaches logic and critical thinking needed in almost every path in life. By 2018, every student will experience basic coding between grades 6 and 9. Government is helping train teachers this year to implement the module.

7. Broad perspectives are embedded. Aboriginal perspectives are included throughout the curriculum and students will learn about the historical wrongs faced by East and South Asian immigrants and Aboriginal people in B.C.

8. Provincial exams will test bedrock skills. Between grades 10 and 12, students will write provincial exams in English and math – skills that cut across every subject and at the heart of the courses that universities and colleges look at during admissions.

9. Testing will be rigorous. In other subjects there will be rigorous classroom-based exams, assessments, tests and projects to measure student progress.

10. Training the teachers, buying technology. Government is providing $6 million for teacher training and technology purchases, as well as dedicated training time, so schools can bring coding and the new curriculum to life.

Just Posted

Ageless in leather and chains, Judas Priest brings Firepower to Kelowna

Rob Halford speaks on the last 50 years with Judas Priest

Kelowna teen fighting for life in Vancouver hospital

A GoFundMe has been set up for KSS’s Erin Tannar

Police swarm residence near UBC Okanagan

Five RCMP cars were seen outside 755 Academy Way Wednesday evening.

Act of kindness caps of Kelowna pee wee hockey team’s season

Pee Wee Rockets made a donation to the Okanagan Boys and Girls Club

Tribute concert to raise money for youth treatment centre in Kelowna

The ABBA and Fleetwood Mac tribute bands will raise funds for he Bridge Youth & Family Services’ Youth Recovery House campaign

Alleged Penticton gunman seen ‘angrily yelling’ before opening fire, witness says

One witness said she heard three bangs, the other said the alleged shooter walked right by him

Okanagan man banned from convenience store for punching clerk

Penticton man was sentenced on charges of assault and theft under $5,000

Prince George sweeps to first-ever BC Hockey League crown

Spruce Kings beat Vernon Vipers 3-1 in the Okanagan Wednesday for 13th straight playoff win

Hwang’s first MLS goal lifts Whitecaps to 1-0 win over LAFC

Vancouver picks up first victory of season

WATCH: Okanagan creator transforms into Megatron

Vernon’s Darren McNiven lives in car and creates Transformer replicas, art in former storage bin

Child-proof your windows ahead of warm weather: B.C. expert

Fifteen children were taken to BC Children’s Hospital for falls in 2018

Salmon Arm church enveloped with care after shooting

Elder: ‘We’re still processing; it will be a while to get over the worst of this.’

African children’s choir brings joy and energy to Okanagan-Shuswap

Performances in Salmon Arm, Penticton and Summerland will raise funds for education.

South Okanagan woman who threatened mom and newborn pleads guilty

Sharon Constance Forner was arrested after a strange home invasion

Most Read