10 things to know about B.C.’s redesigned school curriculum

As students in Lake Country head back to the class, here's some things to learn about the redesigned school curriculum

With students heading back to school

With school kids back in session and a new curriculum being brought in for students in kindergarten to Grade 9 this year, parents might be wondering what the redesigned curriculum entails.

For the past few years, the Ministry of Education has partnered with teachers and education experts to develop a new curriculum that will make sure British Columbia’s students and education system remains a global leader.

Today is back-to-school throughout the province. It’s also the start of the second year of a three-year process of phasing in the new curriculum.

This year the new curriculum will come alive in every kindergarten to Grade 9 class around the province, while draft Grade 10 to 12 curriculum is available to teachers for their feedback and optional use in classrooms.

Here are the 10 things you need to know about B.C.’s new curriculum:

1. The basics of reading, writing and math remain at the heart of the education system. Students will learn – and be tested – on these core skills needed to succeed in university, in the workforce and in life.

2. Tomorrow’s skills today – collaboration, critical thinking, and communications. New curriculum is designed so students learn these skills – which are exactly what post-secondary institutions and employers say they need.

3. New curriculum builds on success. British Columbia has rising graduation rates and some of the best learning outcomes in the world – and the Province is building on this so B.C.’s kids keep succeeding.

4. The focus is on concepts. Students will understand and work with the big ideas, rather than simply memorizing the facts.

5. In this together. B.C.’s new curriculum was developed in consultation with more than 200 teachers nominated by the BC Teachers’ Federation, the Federation of Independent School Associations and First Nations Schools Association. Together, global best practices were looked at.

6. Coding is coming for all students. Coding is a path to careers in the booming tech sector – and it teaches logic and critical thinking needed in almost every path in life. By 2018, every student will experience basic coding between grades 6 and 9. Government is helping train teachers this year to implement the module.

7. Broad perspectives are embedded. Aboriginal perspectives are included throughout the curriculum and students will learn about the historical wrongs faced by East and South Asian immigrants and Aboriginal people in B.C.

8. Provincial exams will test bedrock skills. Between grades 10 and 12, students will write provincial exams in English and math – skills that cut across every subject and at the heart of the courses that universities and colleges look at during admissions.

9. Testing will be rigorous. In other subjects there will be rigorous classroom-based exams, assessments, tests and projects to measure student progress.

10. Training the teachers, buying technology. Government is providing $6 million for teacher training and technology purchases, as well as dedicated training time, so schools can bring coding and the new curriculum to life.

Just Posted

West Kelowna to hire eight more firefighters

The city looks to solve what they are calling a critical shortage of firefighters

Kelowna RCMP look to reunite stamp collection with owner

The stamp collection was handed to RCMP in Oct.

Kelowna RCMP search for speed-slowing cut out

The cut out of Const. Warren Ning has been allegedly taken from A.S. Matheson Elementary School

Battling winter blues, depression and SAD after the holidays

Kick the blues on ‘Blue Monday’ that is supposedly the most depressing day of the year

UPDATE: B.C. legislature managers accused of excessive travel, personal expense claims

Clerk Craig James, security chief Gary Lenz call allegations ‘completely false’

B.C. man fined $10,000 after leaving moose to suffer before death

Surrey man was convicted last week on three Wildlife Act charges

Man charged in 7-Eleven fire in Shuswap granted bail

Accused facing arson charges released with 23 conditions including a 7 p.m. curfew

‘Blue Monday’ isn’t real, but depression can be

CMHA encourages people to prioritize their mental health

Anti-pipeline group wants NEB to consider impact of emissions, climate change

Stand.earth filed NEB motion asking to apply same standard to the project as it did with Energy East pipeline

B.C. man charged in 2014 snake venom death of toddler

Henry Thomas was taking care of the North Vancouver girl the day before she died

Parole granted for drunk driver who killed B.C. RCMP officer

Kenneth Jacob Fenton will be able to attend alcohol abuse treatment, nearly three years after crash that killed Const. Sarah Beckett

B.C.’s largest public-sector union wants inquiry into money laundering, drugs

Union officials say Premier John Horgan and Attorney General David Eby have not ruled out the possibility of a public inquiry

Teen in confrontation with Native American: I didn’t provoke

Nick Sandmann of Covington Catholic High School said he was trying to defuse the situation

Most Read