history

In June 1978, crews were in Summerland to film a movie. The movie filming included a parade along Main Street. Around 2,000 Summerland residents were part of the parade. This included a marching band, led by John Tamblyn. 
(Photo courtesy of the Summerland Museum)

Movie was filmed in Summerland in 1978

Who’ll Save Our Children was aired on CBS Dec. 16, 1978

  • Aug 18, 2020
In June 1978, crews were in Summerland to film a movie. The movie filming included a parade along Main Street. Around 2,000 Summerland residents were part of the parade. This included a marching band, led by John Tamblyn. 
(Photo courtesy of the Summerland Museum)
The Darke Lake area is a popular hunting area. In 1910, hunters from Summerland and Peachland built three cabins. Their names were Ken Hogg, Robert Hogg and Hamilton Lang. Because of their names, the area became know as the Piggeries. One of these hunting cabins still exists. (Photo courtesy of Al Tinka)

Hunting cabins were built west of Summerland

Area around Darke Lake was once known as the Piggeries

The Darke Lake area is a popular hunting area. In 1910, hunters from Summerland and Peachland built three cabins. Their names were Ken Hogg, Robert Hogg and Hamilton Lang. Because of their names, the area became know as the Piggeries. One of these hunting cabins still exists. (Photo courtesy of Al Tinka)
The S.S. Okanagan’s maiden voyage was on April 27 1907. The ship had a capacity of 250 passengers. These ships not only transported people. They were also used for freight and especially important to tow train cars loaded with Okanagan fruit destined for Calgary and other eastern destinations.(Photo courtesy of the Okanagan Archive Trust Society)

Sternwheelers once plied Okanagan Lake

Vessels once transported passengers and goods along the Okanagan Valley

The S.S. Okanagan’s maiden voyage was on April 27 1907. The ship had a capacity of 250 passengers. These ships not only transported people. They were also used for freight and especially important to tow train cars loaded with Okanagan fruit destined for Calgary and other eastern destinations.(Photo courtesy of the Okanagan Archive Trust Society)
History in photos: Constructon of Kelowna Line

History in photos: Constructon of Kelowna Line

This picture was taken sometime around 1922

  • Jul 23, 2020
History in photos: Constructon of Kelowna Line
Okanagan geologist Murray Raod examines the steep cliffs of Crater Mountain or mkʷiwt quell quell sta, a volcano at Trout Creek Canyon from the Summerland Golf Course. (Photo courtesy of the Summerland Museum)

Active volcanoes in South Okanagan

Crater Mountain is one of 16 volcanoes of the Penticton Group of Volcanoes

Okanagan geologist Murray Raod examines the steep cliffs of Crater Mountain or mkʷiwt quell quell sta, a volcano at Trout Creek Canyon from the Summerland Golf Course. (Photo courtesy of the Summerland Museum)
Vernon videographer an ‘accidental historian’

Vernon videographer an ‘accidental historian’

Local film collector Francois Arseneault has more than 2,000 reels and took it upon himself to preserve the history

Vernon videographer an ‘accidental historian’
According to the 1909 provincial assessment records, Summerland was the most prosperous Okanagan community. This section of Shaughnessy Avenue is now Lakeshore Drive. The last building in the row is the Summerland Hotel, promptly built following the founding of Summerland in 1902. The location of the hotel is now the vacant lot across the street from the present day trout hatchery. Next in the row of buildings is Empire Hall with the Summerland Supply Company using the lower floor. Next is the Lakeshore Telephone Office (prior to expansion) and the post office, followed by George McWilliams’s real estate office. (Photograph courtesy of the Summerland Museum)

Summerland Museum to hold walking tours

Community’s past will be explained during series of summer tours

According to the 1909 provincial assessment records, Summerland was the most prosperous Okanagan community. This section of Shaughnessy Avenue is now Lakeshore Drive. The last building in the row is the Summerland Hotel, promptly built following the founding of Summerland in 1902. The location of the hotel is now the vacant lot across the street from the present day trout hatchery. Next in the row of buildings is Empire Hall with the Summerland Supply Company using the lower floor. Next is the Lakeshore Telephone Office (prior to expansion) and the post office, followed by George McWilliams’s real estate office. (Photograph courtesy of the Summerland Museum)
Mohawk Council of Kanesatake Grand Chief Serge Otsi Simon discusses the current situation and actions relating to the Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs during a press conference at the National Press Theatre in Ottawa on Tuesday, Feb. 18, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

30 years after Oka crisis, Kanesatake land claims remain unresolved

Serge Simon, the current Grand Chief of Kanesatake, vividly remembers the events of July 11, 1990

Mohawk Council of Kanesatake Grand Chief Serge Otsi Simon discusses the current situation and actions relating to the Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs during a press conference at the National Press Theatre in Ottawa on Tuesday, Feb. 18, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Summerland Museum reopens

Summerland Museum reopens

Museum to open on July 15 with reduced operating hours

Summerland Museum reopens
Summerland subdivision was developed in 1912

Summerland subdivision was developed in 1912

Victoria Gardens was created by Summerland pioneer couple

Summerland subdivision was developed in 1912
The Trout Creek bridge in Summerland was constructed in 1913. The bridge allowed the community to have train service. (Photo courtesy of the Summerland Museum)

Summerland railway bridge was constructed in 1913

False-work tower had to be constructed twice

The Trout Creek bridge in Summerland was constructed in 1913. The bridge allowed the community to have train service. (Photo courtesy of the Summerland Museum)
Barclay’s ranch is site of present-day Summerland

Barclay’s ranch is site of present-day Summerland

Property was purchased by Sir Thomas Shaughnessy in 1902

Barclay’s ranch is site of present-day Summerland
Flooding in the Swan Lake area in 1948. (Greater Vernon Museum and Archives photo #30879)

Vernon has a long history of flooding

Museum photo from 1948 shows Swan Lake flood

Flooding in the Swan Lake area in 1948. (Greater Vernon Museum and Archives photo #30879)
A Vernon man, and the city, is hoping Victoria will buy 234 acres of Okanagan Lake shoreline in Okanagan Landing for further recreational pursuits. (Colliers International photo)

Vernon man urges province to buy Okanagan Lake property

Mike Brown launches petition for government to purchase historic Okanagan Landing property

A Vernon man, and the city, is hoping Victoria will buy 234 acres of Okanagan Lake shoreline in Okanagan Landing for further recreational pursuits. (Colliers International photo)
An image from the Royal BC Museum’s digitized collection of historical photographs shows an Interior Salish woman and child weaving baskets. The image is one of thousands posted in an online database. (Courtesy of the Royal BC Museum)

B.C. museum releases more than 16,000 historical photos of Indigenous life

Digitized images preserved and shared with Indigenous communities

An image from the Royal BC Museum’s digitized collection of historical photographs shows an Interior Salish woman and child weaving baskets. The image is one of thousands posted in an online database. (Courtesy of the Royal BC Museum)
The Bridge Work Camp was set up in Summerland during the construction of the Trout Creek Railway Bridge. From 1912 to 1913, there were a total of 10 work camps between Summerland and Osprey Lake. The Main Camp was located beside Lewes Avenue, close to today’s Dirty Laundry Winery. (Photo courtesy of the Summerland Museum)

Camps once housed workers along Kettle Valley Railway

Total of 10 camps were established between Summerland and Osprey Lake

The Bridge Work Camp was set up in Summerland during the construction of the Trout Creek Railway Bridge. From 1912 to 1913, there were a total of 10 work camps between Summerland and Osprey Lake. The Main Camp was located beside Lewes Avenue, close to today’s Dirty Laundry Winery. (Photo courtesy of the Summerland Museum)
The Piggeries was once a popular hunting area near Summerland. (Photo courtesy of B.C. Forests Service)

Piggeries was a popular hunting spot near Summerland

Name came from three early hunters in the area

The Piggeries was once a popular hunting area near Summerland. (Photo courtesy of B.C. Forests Service)
Helmut West, pictured holding his daughter Doris, founded Okanagan Sausage in 1967. (Submitted Photo)

Sausage factory fire sparks Okanagan history lesson

Former sausage maker leaves a legacy

Helmut West, pictured holding his daughter Doris, founded Okanagan Sausage in 1967. (Submitted Photo)
Giant’s Head Mountain in Summerland once had a slaughterhouse and a skating rink. (Summerland Museum photo)

Summerland mountain once had slaughterhouse, skating rink

Rink from 1909 was created by Summerland pioneer James Ritchie

  • Jun 7, 2020
Giant’s Head Mountain in Summerland once had a slaughterhouse and a skating rink. (Summerland Museum photo)
Crews building structure at former Summerland train station site

Crews building structure at former Summerland train station site

West Summerland Station will pay tribute to railway history, serve as trail marker

Crews building structure at former Summerland train station site