history

Pharis and Jason Romero filmed their latest video with Rick Magnell in the historic 153 Mile Store. (Rick Magnell video capture)

VIDEO: Juno-award winning folk duo showcase B.C. history in new song

Video filmed in historic 153 Mile Store was the ‘perfect place’

Pharis and Jason Romero filmed their latest video with Rick Magnell in the historic 153 Mile Store. (Rick Magnell video capture)
This historic photo is of a a large herd of cows moving from one field to another in front of the Rainsford Ranch in 1907.

Kalamalka Lake is in the background. The Goulding family lived in Oyama from 1907 to 1929. George Cassilis Goulding (1886–1943) was a horse breeder and an orchardist who first owned the Rainsford Ranch, and then moved, in the early 1920’s, to Iris Point (now Kaloya Park).

Historic photo: Rainsford Ranch

A look back at Lake Country’s history

  • May 12, 2022
This historic photo is of a a large herd of cows moving from one field to another in front of the Rainsford Ranch in 1907.

Kalamalka Lake is in the background. The Goulding family lived in Oyama from 1907 to 1929. George Cassilis Goulding (1886–1943) was a horse breeder and an orchardist who first owned the Rainsford Ranch, and then moved, in the early 1920’s, to Iris Point (now Kaloya Park).
Nanaimo’s No. 1 mine. (Submitted photo)

May 3, 1887: Remembering 150 lives lost in B.C.’s worst-ever mining disaster

City of Nanaimo lowering flags to commemorate Esplanade Mine explosion that killed 150

Nanaimo’s No. 1 mine. (Submitted photo)
Traffic in 1915 was not the same as it is today. This picture shows the edge of what is now Summerland’s Main Street. At that time, the majority of transportation was done by horse-drawn wagons rather than gasoline-powered cars and trucks. Electric vehicle charging stations at public spots in downtown Summerland did not exist until nearly a century later. The first charging stations opened in April, 2013. The house in the background is the Alex Steven home, which still overlooks the downtown core. (Photo courtesy of the Summerland Museum)

Summerland has been transititioning its transportation

Horse-drawn wagons, automobiles and now electric vehicles used on streets in community

Traffic in 1915 was not the same as it is today. This picture shows the edge of what is now Summerland’s Main Street. At that time, the majority of transportation was done by horse-drawn wagons rather than gasoline-powered cars and trucks. Electric vehicle charging stations at public spots in downtown Summerland did not exist until nearly a century later. The first charging stations opened in April, 2013. The house in the background is the Alex Steven home, which still overlooks the downtown core. (Photo courtesy of the Summerland Museum)
Volunteers are organizing to purchase and preserve Golden’s Swiss Village. (RE/MAX Golden)

Golden’s Swiss Village Foundation crowdfunds to save property

The Swiss Edelweiss Village Foundation has temporarily secured the property

Volunteers are organizing to purchase and preserve Golden’s Swiss Village. (RE/MAX Golden)
Neskonlith knowledge keeper Louis Thomas and Salmon Arm Arts Centre supporter Dolores Mori take time for a chat on March 25, 2022 as Thomas speaks about the significance of the Good Spirit Box which contains digital recordings of Secwépemc creation stories or Chiptekwilah. (Martha Wickett - Salmon Arm Observer)

Good Spirit Box shares digital recordings of Secwépemc creation stories

Stories from Neskonlith, Splatsin provide guidance regarding relationship to the land

Neskonlith knowledge keeper Louis Thomas and Salmon Arm Arts Centre supporter Dolores Mori take time for a chat on March 25, 2022 as Thomas speaks about the significance of the Good Spirit Box which contains digital recordings of Secwépemc creation stories or Chiptekwilah. (Martha Wickett - Salmon Arm Observer)
This historic photo is of Wood Lake Resort. The resort was a popular tourist destination for many years in what is now Lake Country. The Wood Lake Resort consisted of several small square cabins adjacent to the beach, a large lodge, and a camping area behind the lodge, flanking the south side of Bottom Wood Lake Road. 
(Photo provided by the Lake Country Museum & Archives)

Historic photo: Wood Lake Resort

A look back at Lake Country’s history

  • Apr 7, 2022
This historic photo is of Wood Lake Resort. The resort was a popular tourist destination for many years in what is now Lake Country. The Wood Lake Resort consisted of several small square cabins adjacent to the beach, a large lodge, and a camping area behind the lodge, flanking the south side of Bottom Wood Lake Road. 
(Photo provided by the Lake Country Museum & Archives)
Lake Country boat landmark destroyed in fire April 1, 2021

No plans to replace the Holiday Park Resort fire ravaged boat

The historic blue and white boat was destroyed in a fire April 2021 near Lake Country

Lake Country boat landmark destroyed in fire April 1, 2021
The construction crew of the Vernon Courthouse in 1911, prior to the completion in 1914. (Vernon Photo Co./Greater Vernon Museum and Archives)

Okanagan history preserved online

Historial documents, photos available to public through partnerships

The construction crew of the Vernon Courthouse in 1911, prior to the completion in 1914. (Vernon Photo Co./Greater Vernon Museum and Archives)
Summerland’s old name was Nicola Prairie. This old term was used to describe someone’s property, in this case, Grand Chief Nicola. One reason this area was chosen was because of the excellent protection provided by the silt cliffs. Lake access to the flat land was limited to just a few trails. Three access trails have evidence of battle sites. The most famous was the Battle of Aqskepkina. Numerous burial sites, arrowheads, some jade jewelry and one green copper knife were found. (Photo courtesy of the Summerland Museum)

Indigenous artifacts have been found in and near Summerland

Present-day community was once Indigenous land

Summerland’s old name was Nicola Prairie. This old term was used to describe someone’s property, in this case, Grand Chief Nicola. One reason this area was chosen was because of the excellent protection provided by the silt cliffs. Lake access to the flat land was limited to just a few trails. Three access trails have evidence of battle sites. The most famous was the Battle of Aqskepkina. Numerous burial sites, arrowheads, some jade jewelry and one green copper knife were found. (Photo courtesy of the Summerland Museum)
This 1917 photograph shows Joan Steven (nee Nicoll) and her daughters Joan and Margaret. The Steven home is the home on the hillside at the end of Main Street in Summerland and is the site of the Christmas nativity scene. The building to the left in the 
photograph is the Summerland Baptist Church, officially opened in January 1909. (Summerland Museum photo)

Steven exported fruit to the British Empire

Street in Summerland named after pioneer orchardist

This 1917 photograph shows Joan Steven (nee Nicoll) and her daughters Joan and Margaret. The Steven home is the home on the hillside at the end of Main Street in Summerland and is the site of the Christmas nativity scene. The building to the left in the 
photograph is the Summerland Baptist Church, officially opened in January 1909. (Summerland Museum photo)
Lakeshore Drive in 1930, looking east. (Penticton Museum and Archives photo)

Penticton’s Okanagan lakeshore was not always owned by the city

W. T. Shatford donated waterfront so it would always be public and not ‘marred by unsightly buildings’

Lakeshore Drive in 1930, looking east. (Penticton Museum and Archives photo)
Recently, the Summerland Museum was given a photograph of the Summerland Hotel, In 1902, Sir Thomas Shaughnessy quickly had this hotel built, shortly after he founded Summerland. This photograph of the hotel is the finest photograph in the museum’s collection. Today, the site of this hotel is the vacant lot across the street from the Trout Hatchery. The museum is always searching for old photographs. Old photographs can be scanned by museum staff and promptly returned to the owner. (Photo courtesy of the Summerland Museum)

Summerland had hotel near lakeshore

Summerland Hotel was built in 1902, but destroyed by fire in 1925

Recently, the Summerland Museum was given a photograph of the Summerland Hotel, In 1902, Sir Thomas Shaughnessy quickly had this hotel built, shortly after he founded Summerland. This photograph of the hotel is the finest photograph in the museum’s collection. Today, the site of this hotel is the vacant lot across the street from the Trout Hatchery. The museum is always searching for old photographs. Old photographs can be scanned by museum staff and promptly returned to the owner. (Photo courtesy of the Summerland Museum)
The village is over a century old and is an important historical site and was at one point the gateway to the mountaneering community in the Canadian Rockies. (RE/MAX photo)

Saving Golden’s Swiss Village: Dr. Johann Roduit and Dr. Ilona Spaar reflect on iconic B.C. spot

The historic Edelweiss Village has been for sale for over a year, and preservation talks are moving

The village is over a century old and is an important historical site and was at one point the gateway to the mountaneering community in the Canadian Rockies. (RE/MAX photo)
Harrowdene was the name given to Harry Dunsdon’s ranch house in Garnett Valley. He pre-empted his land on April 2 1894, just west of the Garnett brothers. The name came from Dunsdon’s hometown in Middlesex, England. The family home was located across a field from the prestigious Harrow School. Several of Summerland’s first pioneers had been students at the school. (Photo courtesy of the Summerland Museum)

Dunsdon family played role in Summerland’s history

Harry Dunsdon settled in area in 1890s and constructed first dam

Harrowdene was the name given to Harry Dunsdon’s ranch house in Garnett Valley. He pre-empted his land on April 2 1894, just west of the Garnett brothers. The name came from Dunsdon’s hometown in Middlesex, England. The family home was located across a field from the prestigious Harrow School. Several of Summerland’s first pioneers had been students at the school. (Photo courtesy of the Summerland Museum)
Greater Victoria photographer Don Denton is working to discover and preserve the history of B.C.’s forgotten photographers. (Justin Samanski-Langille/News Staff)

B.C. photographer working to unearth province’s forgotten camera artists

Don Denton collecting and preserving details of mostly unknown photographers

Greater Victoria photographer Don Denton is working to discover and preserve the history of B.C.’s forgotten photographers. (Justin Samanski-Langille/News Staff)
A drum song performer participates in a drumg song at Kelowna’s City Park Friday afternoon (June 4). Hundreds came out to honour the lives of the 215 Indigenous children whose remains were discovered last week at the former grounds of the Kamloops Indian Residential School. (Aaron Hemens/Capital News)

Vernon School District thrilled to showcase culture for Indigenous History Month

A number of organizations have signed on in different ways in June

A drum song performer participates in a drumg song at Kelowna’s City Park Friday afternoon (June 4). Hundreds came out to honour the lives of the 215 Indigenous children whose remains were discovered last week at the former grounds of the Kamloops Indian Residential School. (Aaron Hemens/Capital News)
Lee Brandt, A Langley-based crane operator who grew up in Milner will make his television show debut with History TV Canada’s new series, Lost Car Rescue. (Special to Langley Advance Times)

Crane, planes and automobiles star in History Network’s Lost Car Rescue

Rescuing classic cars requires more than a love for the classics and…

Lee Brandt, A Langley-based crane operator who grew up in Milner will make his television show debut with History TV Canada’s new series, Lost Car Rescue. (Special to Langley Advance Times)
This is the James R. Doherty ice house, originally located at the west end of Denike Street in Prairie Valley. Prior to the invention of the refrigerator, ice houses were used to store ice. Ice was protected by the insulating properties of straw and sawdust. The District of Summerland leased out ice on the Trout Creek Reservoir at a rate of 20 cents per ton. The district also determined the selling price: $1.15 per ton to Summerland customers. The ice had to be at least 12 inches thick before harvesting. For most years, Robert Mitchell (1861-1949) was awarded the contract. To the right of the ice house is Doherty’s fruit sprayer. (Photo courtesy of the Doherty family)

Ice was once harvested in Summerland

Before refrigeration, ice was collected and sold to customers

  • Jan 19, 2022
This is the James R. Doherty ice house, originally located at the west end of Denike Street in Prairie Valley. Prior to the invention of the refrigerator, ice houses were used to store ice. Ice was protected by the insulating properties of straw and sawdust. The District of Summerland leased out ice on the Trout Creek Reservoir at a rate of 20 cents per ton. The district also determined the selling price: $1.15 per ton to Summerland customers. The ice had to be at least 12 inches thick before harvesting. For most years, Robert Mitchell (1861-1949) was awarded the contract. To the right of the ice house is Doherty’s fruit sprayer. (Photo courtesy of the Doherty family)
In 1908, Summerland’s first curling rink was located on the community’s drinking water reservoir. The man with the bowler hat was Frank Osler. The Osler family is one of Canada’s most famous families. One of Frank Osler’s brothers was Sir William Osler, one of the world’s most esteemed medical doctors. Another brother, and Summerland land owner, was Sir Edmund Osler, national president of the Dominion Bank (later TD bank). Another brother was Britton Osler, a famous lawyer (Louis Riel trial). Another brother was Judge Fetherston Osler. (Photograph courtesy of the Summerland Museum)

Curling in Summerland was once held outdoors

Drinking water reservoir was once used for curling

In 1908, Summerland’s first curling rink was located on the community’s drinking water reservoir. The man with the bowler hat was Frank Osler. The Osler family is one of Canada’s most famous families. One of Frank Osler’s brothers was Sir William Osler, one of the world’s most esteemed medical doctors. Another brother, and Summerland land owner, was Sir Edmund Osler, national president of the Dominion Bank (later TD bank). Another brother was Britton Osler, a famous lawyer (Louis Riel trial). Another brother was Judge Fetherston Osler. (Photograph courtesy of the Summerland Museum)