Cancer

Matthew and Kari Atkins have been paying $1,200 a month to treat Kari’s metastatic breast cancer for the last several months. (Submitted photo)

B.C. couple left to foot $1,200-a-month cancer treatment bill due to ‘funding loophole’

Kari and Matthew Atkins hope the government will offer funding for people in their situation

 

People are rallying behind the Drombolis family of North Langley. Dad Shane has been battling a rare form of cancer and mom Kristine was recently diagnosed with the very same condition. (GoFundMe)

Community rallies to help B.C. couple battling rare form of cancer

GoFundMe launched after wife was diagnosed with the same rare cancer husband is fighting

 

A health care worker is seen outside the Emergency dept. of the Vancouver General Hospital in Vancouver on March 30, 2020. he B.C. government says temporary pandemic pay that was promised to essential workers in mid-May should be coming in October. The stipend was promised to hundreds of thousands of essential workers for work done between March and July and some workers say they’re frustrated it still hasn’t arrived. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

PETERS: Nurses give far more than just medical care

On National Nurses Week, it’s time to think back to the nurses who have cared for us

 

The White Rock Lake wildfire in North Okanagan is shown burning during the 2021 B.C. wildfire season. (Terry Lawson/Facebook)

B.C. wildfires may be linked to 10% higher chance of brain tumours

New study finds higher incidence of lung cancer and brain tumours due to wildfire exposures

The White Rock Lake wildfire in North Okanagan is shown burning during the 2021 B.C. wildfire season. (Terry Lawson/Facebook)
Firefighters-Cancer 20220505 Vancouver firefighter Jenn Dawkins, shown in a handout photo, lobbied for breast cancer to be included in British Columbia’s legislation as a presumed occupational illness covered by the province’s health and safety agency for workers. Three years later, she would be diagnosed with the disease that is a top killer of firefighters. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-David Harcus

Firefighters say recognition of their cancer risk is tough battle across Canada

British Columbia recently amended the Workers Compensation Act to include three more cancers

Firefighters-Cancer 20220505 Vancouver firefighter Jenn Dawkins, shown in a handout photo, lobbied for breast cancer to be included in British Columbia’s legislation as a presumed occupational illness covered by the province’s health and safety agency for workers. Three years later, she would be diagnosed with the disease that is a top killer of firefighters. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-David Harcus
Firefighters are covered by workers’ compensation benefits for 13 known high-risk cancers – the province plans to add ovarian, cervical and penile cancers. (Province of BC/Flickr)

B.C. adds 3 cancers to coverage for firefighters – ovarian, cervical, penile

Firefighters covered sooner for testicular, colorectal, esophageal cancers

Firefighters are covered by workers’ compensation benefits for 13 known high-risk cancers – the province plans to add ovarian, cervical and penile cancers. (Province of BC/Flickr)
This 1974 microscope image made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows changes in cells indicative of adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Some doctors say it’s time to rename low-grade prostate cancer to eliminate the alarming C word. About 34,000 Americans die from prostate cancer annually, but most prostate cancers are harmless. A paper published Monday, April 18, 2022 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology is reviving a debate about dropping the word “cancer” when patients learn the results of these low-risk biopsy findings. (Dr. Edwin P. Ewing, Jr./CDC via AP)

Doctors suggest new names for low-grade prostate cancer

Medical professionals look to eliminate alarming word

This 1974 microscope image made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows changes in cells indicative of adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Some doctors say it’s time to rename low-grade prostate cancer to eliminate the alarming C word. About 34,000 Americans die from prostate cancer annually, but most prostate cancers are harmless. A paper published Monday, April 18, 2022 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology is reviving a debate about dropping the word “cancer” when patients learn the results of these low-risk biopsy findings. (Dr. Edwin P. Ewing, Jr./CDC via AP)
Vials of blood from a participant in a clinical study of the effectiveness of a new liquid biopsy technology are packaged for shipment at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland, Ore., on March 14, 2022. The clinical trial will follow hundreds of participants for three years to see if signals of any cancers that participants later develop were present in their blood. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus)

Can cancer blood tests live up to their promise of saving lives?

U.S. government researchers are planning a large experiment to test effectiveness

Vials of blood from a participant in a clinical study of the effectiveness of a new liquid biopsy technology are packaged for shipment at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland, Ore., on March 14, 2022. The clinical trial will follow hundreds of participants for three years to see if signals of any cancers that participants later develop were present in their blood. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus)
Catherine getting ready for the next round of chemo, with her three kids for support. (GoFundMe/Special to The News)

B.C. family in need of support after mother’s stage 4 breast cancer diagnosis

Seek funds to cover treatment and care for their three autism-diagnosed kids

Catherine getting ready for the next round of chemo, with her three kids for support. (GoFundMe/Special to The News)
Steve Fonyo, who raised millions for cancer research by running across Canada on an artificial limb, has died. Fonyo is shown dippping his artifical limb in the Pacific Ocean in Victoria after completing his cross-country run in this 1985 photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chuck Stoody

Steve Fonyo, who lost leg to cancer and ran across Canada to raise funds, dead at 56

Fonyo lost a leg to cancer when he was 12, became a national hero after completing a Canada-wide marathon

Steve Fonyo, who raised millions for cancer research by running across Canada on an artificial limb, has died. Fonyo is shown dippping his artifical limb in the Pacific Ocean in Victoria after completing his cross-country run in this 1985 photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chuck Stoody
Premier John Horgan makes his first public appearance since completing cancer treatment for Lunar New Year at the B.C. legislature on Tuesday, Feb. 1, 2022. (John Horgan/Twitter)

Horgan celebrates Lunar New Year at B.C. legislature after multi-week cancer treatment

Event was the B.C. premier’s first public appearance since completing cancer treatment

Premier John Horgan makes his first public appearance since completing cancer treatment for Lunar New Year at the B.C. legislature on Tuesday, Feb. 1, 2022. (John Horgan/Twitter)
B.C. Premier John Horgan speaks at a press conference in Vancouver on September 16, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Premier Horgan completes throat cancer treatment, says he’s ‘feeling better every day’

B.C.’s premier was diagnosed with throat cancer in fall 2021

B.C. Premier John Horgan speaks at a press conference in Vancouver on September 16, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
New studies suggest constant light alcohol consumption puts you at risk for various cancers just as much as binge drinking. (Pixabay photo)

Light alcohol consumption just as risky as binge drinking, BC Cancer study says

One out of seven new cancers were caused by light to moderate drinking in 2020

New studies suggest constant light alcohol consumption puts you at risk for various cancers just as much as binge drinking. (Pixabay photo)
Premier John Horgan makes his address during the BC NDP virtual convention on Saturday, Dec. 12, 2021. (BC NDP)

B.C. Premier John Horgan says throat cancer prognosis is ‘very, very good’

Premier expected to start treatment over next couple of days

Premier John Horgan makes his address during the BC NDP virtual convention on Saturday, Dec. 12, 2021. (BC NDP)
This image provided by the National Institutes of Health shows an osteosarcoma cell with DNA in blue, energy factories (mitochondria) in yellow and actin filaments, part of the cellular skeleton, in purple. Eight years ago, a team of researchers launched a project to carefully repeat influential lab experiments in cancer research. They recreated 50 experiments, the type of work with mice and test tubes that sets the stage for new cancer drugs. They reported the results Tuesday, Dec. 7, 2021: About half the scientific claims didn’t hold up. (National Institute of Health via AP)

Study can’t confirm lab results for many cancer experiments

New study reflects on shortcomings early in the scientific process

This image provided by the National Institutes of Health shows an osteosarcoma cell with DNA in blue, energy factories (mitochondria) in yellow and actin filaments, part of the cellular skeleton, in purple. Eight years ago, a team of researchers launched a project to carefully repeat influential lab experiments in cancer research. They recreated 50 experiments, the type of work with mice and test tubes that sets the stage for new cancer drugs. They reported the results Tuesday, Dec. 7, 2021: About half the scientific claims didn’t hold up. (National Institute of Health via AP)
An online fundraiser has been launched for Dot Glennie, a Vernon mother recently diagnosed with aggressive lung cancer in both lungs. (Facebook photo)

Financial aid sought for Vernon mother’s cancer fight

Dot Glennie was recently diagnosed with aggressive lung cancer in both lungs

An online fundraiser has been launched for Dot Glennie, a Vernon mother recently diagnosed with aggressive lung cancer in both lungs. (Facebook photo)
B.C. Cancer Society representative Kate De Kruif (front row, centre) holds a cheque for $800 from the Vernon Panthers’ senior and junior varsity football teams. The money was raised by both squads in October – Breast Cancer Awareness Month – through concession sales and draws at the teams’ home games at Greater Vernon Athletic Park. IContributed)

Vernon Panthers football squads go pink raising cancer funds

Junior and senior varsity teams donate $800 to B.C. Cancer Society from funds raised at October home games

B.C. Cancer Society representative Kate De Kruif (front row, centre) holds a cheque for $800 from the Vernon Panthers’ senior and junior varsity football teams. The money was raised by both squads in October – Breast Cancer Awareness Month – through concession sales and draws at the teams’ home games at Greater Vernon Athletic Park. IContributed)
FILE – B.C. Premier John Horgan speaks in Vancouver, on Thursday, September 16, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

B.C. Premier John Horgan diagnosed with cancer following throat biopsy

Premier expected to make a full recovery

FILE – B.C. Premier John Horgan speaks in Vancouver, on Thursday, September 16, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
To celebrate finishing his first round of chemotherapy, Addison Johnston (left) and his younger brother Ryland were taken to a Japanese restaurant in Vancouver by parents Kristin and Shane Johnston. But lots of treatment remains for the teenager, and his family has learned some hard lessons about the healthcare system. (submitted photo)

Chilliwack parents discover gaps in health care as teenage son battles leukemia

Though he’s 17-years-old, Addison Johnston couldn’t access treatment at B.C. Children’s Hospital

To celebrate finishing his first round of chemotherapy, Addison Johnston (left) and his younger brother Ryland were taken to a Japanese restaurant in Vancouver by parents Kristin and Shane Johnston. But lots of treatment remains for the teenager, and his family has learned some hard lessons about the healthcare system. (submitted photo)
Tena McKenzie leads riders around Wood Lake on the Okanagan Rail Trail Sunday, Oct. 4 for the CIBC Run for the Cure, where she adapted the event to a Ride for the Cure. (J.P. Squire photo)

UPDATE: Oyama breast cancer survivor marks 10 years at Ride for the Cure

Sporting her pink Pedego electric bike, Tena and her team circled Wood Lake Oct. 4

Tena McKenzie leads riders around Wood Lake on the Okanagan Rail Trail Sunday, Oct. 4 for the CIBC Run for the Cure, where she adapted the event to a Ride for the Cure. (J.P. Squire photo)