Admission to all Kelowna Museums Society locations, including the OHM, is by donation and is suggested at $5 per person or $15 for a family. (Contributed)

Okanagan Heritage Museum to showcase special Canadian hockey exhibition

The exhibition can be seen from Dec. 7 to Feb 29, 2020

Hockey is many things, the game we watch on Saturday nights, the sweat-soaked smell of a locker room, an overtime winner, a soaring crowd. But most of all, it is an enduring national passion that unites all Canadians regardless of geography, language, gender or age.

The Okanagan Heritage Museum (OHM) is celebrating Canada’s game with a one-of-a-kind traveling exhibition from the Canadian Museum of History. Hockey, presented from Dec. 7, 2019, to Feb. 29, 2020, looks at how the sport has influenced Canadian lives and what that reveals about us as people.

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From Paul Henderson’s winning goal for Canada in the 1972 Summit Series to Manon Rheaume’s debut as NHL goalie to Sheldon Kennedy’s classic story of the Hockey Sweater and Shania Twain’s NHL-inspired stage outfits, the exhibition also reminds us of how deeply hockey is rooted in Canadian life.

Amanda Snyder, the curatorial manager of the Kelowna Museums Society, is excited to see the exhibit visit Kelowna.

“Hockey is such an important part of the fabric of Canadian life, and we’re delighted to be hosting Hockey at the Okanagan Heritage Museum this winter,” she said.

“This is an exhibit that is going to have broad appeal across generations, and we look forward to welcoming you to the OHM. Bring family, bring friends and learn more about Canada’s favorite game!”

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The exhibition is an engaging two-dimensional display that uses photographs and images of key artifacts, memorabilia and works of art to present hockey highlights from yesterday and today. Listen to audio archives from hockey history and get into the game by recording your own running commentary, just like legendary sportscaster Foster Hewitt.

“The Canadian Museum of History is thrilled to share Hockey with the people of Kelowna,” said Mark O’Neill, president and CEO of the Canadian Museum of History. “Whether we hit the ice or cheer from our living rooms, hockey is more than just a game to Canadians. It has helped shape our history and our national identity from coast to coast to coast.”

Admission to all Kelowna Museums Society locations, including the OHM, is by donation and is suggested at $5 per person or $15 for a family.


@Niftymittens14
daniel.taylor@kelownacapnews.com

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