Vernon is dotted with a colourful array of election signs prior to Monday’s vote. (Jennifer Smith - Morning Star)

Vernon is dotted with a colourful array of election signs prior to Monday’s vote. (Jennifer Smith - Morning Star)

Sign, sign, everywhere a sign

MITCHELL’S MUSINGS: Election brings a colourful array of elections signs

Glenn Mitchell

Mitchell’s Musings

Another election dawns on Monday and it’s time to take stock on what this campaign has brought us Canadians so far.

Locally, it’s certainly brought us lots of colourful signs dotting the landscape. This used to bother me a lot as signs on private property used to stand for something as residents revealed their true colours and actually promoted who they thought would be the best candidate.

Nowadays, that’s pretty rare as people don’t seem to want to alienate neighbours in these divisive times, or we’re just gutless, take your pick.

But what does a plethora of signs at the roundabout (public property I might add) behind Safeway mean, other than party workers have made a political rainbow of sorts that’s semi-attractive and proves that democracy is alive and well and living in the roundabout at least?

Does more signs on public property mean more public support? Do bigger signs mean more concentrated or heavier support? And do the most signs win the popularity contest so if you want to be on the winning side you better vote accordingly?

I know advertising works, everywhere and anywhere, but in this case I think the big winners are the sign makers, and unless these signs are cleaned up on Tuesday the environment is the loser.

I vow right now, before God and my 9.5 faithful readers, that if I ever run for political office that I will not put up signs, on principle, and because I’m a cheap son of a gun.

Anyway the winner, locally, is going to be Mel Arnold and the Conservatives. Not because he put up the most signs or even conducted the best campaign, but because the Tories almost always win here unless there’s Trudeaumania or a very strong local candidate based in Vernon, or both.

READ MORE: Letter: Election outcome predictable in North Okanagan-Shuswap

There’s a strong senior contingent here and they tend to be conservative (I tell my kids that wise saying “that if you’re young and not liberal you don’t have a heart, but if you’re older and you’re still liberal you don’t have a brain” is mostly true) and the young aren’t being inspired by Justin Trudeau this time, or anyone else for that matter.

So they may just stay home. If trends and polls count for anything (and believe me they aren’t always right, thankfully, and there’s still a weekend to go) we may have a Conservative government led by Prime Minister Andrew Scheer and our MP will be on the government side this time.

One bit of advice this time though Mel, see if you can stay out of the top 10 MPs for travel expenses for wives, a whopping $121,138.05 to take fourth place in the country, just missing a bronze medal.

I’m sure it’s cold and lonely in Ottawa and it’s kind of romantic and all having your wife there, a lot, but go to a couple Senators games or something, heck get a season’s ticket, or two.

I’m sure it’s a write-off and it will save us taxpayers a lot of money. Either that or a hot water bottle. No thanks needed, you’re welcome. And congratulations.

Although I think the change is due to people voting out parties and personalities more than voting parties and leaders in (see Stephen Harper and the Tories after 10 years), a change has got to be better than the current regime, forgetting, perhaps, that it’s much easier to criticize than to actually govern.

Add in the fact that the bloom was off the rose for Trudeau, several missteps including black face/brown face which made him look silly and hypocritical at the same time, and opened up the door for the uninspirational Scheer, who left his own screwups, Bill 21 and same-sex marriages, on the table without explanation.

Of course wanting change is how the world ended up with Trump. I’m not saying Scheer is Trump. Of course not, Scheer is much younger. Ha.

But apparently we do know that Scheer was voted most likely in his high school grad class to be leader of the Reform Party one day, and that’s come true, and so much for being an idealistic youth out to save the world (not to mention being somewhat of a dweeb and possibly heartless, see earlier quote).

He became an MP at age 25, so it appears he hasn’t had a real job unless you count insurance broker which he put on his resume but then admitted during the campaign he really wasn’t one officially.

Kind of like the dual citizenship he carried that he has denounced others for in the past.

Oh well, he smiles a lot and seems like a nice guy, which you definitely can’t say about his apparent mentor, Stephen Harper. But then a wannabe Stephen Harper with a smile sounds a bit sinister too.

So, a new, raw, young, untested rookie prime minister with dubious qualifications sounds interesting if not very familiar.

Right, it’s 2015 all over again.

READ MORE: North Okanagan-Shuswap candidates spending little on Facebook


@VernonNews
letters@vernonmorningstar.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

A Vernon councillor is facing potential legal action from a former city councillor. (Jennifer Smith - Morning Star)
Diversity debate leaves Vernon politician threatened with legal action

Coun. Dalvir Nahal alleged to have defamed a former politician, who is seeking concessions

District of Coldstream municipal offices. (Morning Star file photo)
Coldstream staff recommend cutting outdated, conflicting policies

A staff report also calls for Kal Lak access protections in the next Official Community Plan

Doses of the Pfizer coronavirus vaccine are seen being prepared on Wednesday, May 12, 2021, in Decatur, Ga. Hundreds of children, ages 12 to 15, received the Pfizer vaccine at the DeKalb Pediatric Center, just days after it was approved for use within their age group. (AP Photo/Ron Harris)
One death, 60 new cases of COVID-19 in Interior Health

The death is connected to the outbreak at Spring Valley long-term care in Kelowna

The. B.C. Court of Appeal granted a retrial to former Vernon man William Schneider, convicted of second-degree murder in the 2016 death of Japanese exchange student Natsumi Kogawa. The trial is set to begin May 24, 2022. (Vancouver Police Department photo)
Retrial date set for former Vernon man’s murder conviction

William Schneider’s trial, connected to the death of Natsumi Kogawa, is set for May 2022

(Contributed/PadMapper)
Kelowna has Canada’s 7th most expensive rental market: report

PadMapper’s monthly rent report shows Kelowna residents pay, on average, $1,480 for a one-bedroom unit

Prince Rupert was one of the first B.C. communities targeted for mass vaccination after a steep rise in infections. Grey area marks community-wide vaccine distribution. (B.C. Centre for Disease Control)
B.C. tracks big drop in COVID-19 infections after vaccination

Prince Rupert, Indigenous communities show improvement

The bodies of Carlo and Erick Fryer were discovered by a local couple walking on a remote forest road in Naramata on May 10. (Submitted)
Kamloops brothers identified as pair found dead near Penticton

The bodies of Carlo and Erick Fryer were discovered by a local couple walking

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Municipal governments around B.C. have emergency authority to conduct meetings online, use mail voting and spend reserve funds on operation expenses. (Penticton Western News)
Online council meetings, mail-in voting option to be extended in B.C.

Proposed law makes municipal COVID-19 exceptions permanent

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good
Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

A nurse prepares a dose of the COVID-19 vaccine in Kelowna on Tuesday, March 16. (Phil McLachlan/Black Press)
British Columbians aged 20+ can book for vaccine Saturday, those 18+ on Sunday

‘We are also actively working to to incorporate the ages 12 to 17 into our immunization program’

The AstraZeneca-Oxford University vaccine. (AP/Eranga Jayawardena)
2nd person in B.C. diagnosed with rare blood clotting after AstraZeneca vaccine

The man, in his 40s, is currently receiving care at a hospital in the Fraser Health region

Brian Peach rescues ducklings from a storm drain in Smithers May 12. (Lauren L’Orsa video screen shot)
VIDEO: Smithers neighbours rescue ducklings from storm drain

Momma and babies made it safely back to the creek that runs behind Turner Way

Signage for ICBC, the Insurance Corporation of British Columbia, is shown in Victoria, B.C., on February 6, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
$150 refunds issued to eligible customers following ICBC’s switch to ‘enhanced care’

Savings amassed from the insurance policy change will lead to one-time rebates for close to 4 million customers

Most Read