Tib Goldie, drawing a wagon in front of the family home. - Contributed

Historical happenings: Goldie saga highlights importance of family history

The Goldie family came to Canada in 1844, brought by their great-grandfather John Goldie, who died in 1886. David Goldie, father of James Goldie, played an important role in establishing the family’s name; for David’s achievements were remarkable.

In The Goldie Saga, Theresa Goldie (Tib) recalled only one memory of her father. It was sadly of him on his death bed. Mrs. David Goldie (Isabella Easton), also known as Bella, took care of 10 children after David’s passing.

The children grew up in a giant house in the Gore, Ont. The inside was extremely comfortable and designed for a large family. To the average person, the home encompassed unheard-of luxuries; there was a very fancy indoor washroom. The house also had a central furnace, which used hot water that flowed through pipes in the walls. Additionally, there were at least nine different fireplaces.

READ MORE: Oyama settlers after the First World War

Although she never lived in Lake Country, Tib was a welcomed visitor at the Rainbow Ranch. James Goldie and Robert Dormer purchased half the property, not long after James moved to the area, around 1908. James married Jessie Ross, in February 1913 (he made the proposal in 1912, at the Calgary Stampede). James managed the Rainbow Ranch until 1948. Japanese settlers were welcomed to work on the orchard, under the supervision of foreman Shigehisa (Sam) Hikichi. After sub-dividing, they continued to live on a small portion of the Rainbow Ranch.

Both James and Jessie passed away in the early 1970s. Goldies, even today, are well-known and respected in Okanagan Centre, Lake Country. The family name lives on through younger generations in the area.

Visit the Lake Country Museum to see photos of Tib, James, and other influential people connected to the Goldie family who were in Lake Country.

Every week, the Lake Country Calendar will publish a column from the Lake Country Museum highlighting our community’s past.

Just Posted

‘Our sales are hurting’ Kelowna music hub takes hit after big competition moves in

Milkcrate Records still taking a hit after Sunrise Records moved into town 2 years ago

Kelowna cat hit by car uses seven of nine lives, needs help for surgery

Seven is currently recovering at the SPCA in Kelowna

Lake Country’s Citizen of the Year never expected to win award

“I was totally blown away, I had no idea,” Robert Conelley said.

Housing proposed on popular Kelowna golf course land

Kelowna council may implement changes at the Quail golf course

Temperatures on the rise for the Okanagan Valley

Okanagan-Shuswap weekday weather update

Research needs to catch up with B.C.’s gas drilling industry, experts say

Hydraulic fracturing review ordered by Premier John Horgan

Father thanks B.C. Mountie for shooting hoops with kids, ‘changing perspectives’

‘We’re just like everyone else,’ says Surrey officer who stopped to play basketball with kids

2019 BUDGET: As deficit grows, feds spend on job retraining, home incentives

Stronger economy last year delivered unexpected revenue bump of an extra $27.8 billion over six years

Men ready to strut in their underwear for South Okanagan triathlete

Okanoggin Barbers second underwear fashion show happening Wednesday at Barking Parrot

Trans Mountain court hearing: B.C. says it won’t reject pipelines without cause

Canada says the proposed amendments to B.C.’s Environmental Management Act must be struck down

Okanagan dancers kick up heels for spring

PHOTOS: Spring Fling sees more than 60 converge in Vernon from as far as Okanagan Falls and Salmon Arm

Carfentanil found in 15% of overdose deaths in January: B.C. coroner

Carfentanil is 100 times more powerful than illicit fentanyl and used to tranquilize elephants

Most Read