United States President Joe Biden listens as Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau delivers his statement during a virtual joint statement following a virtual meeting in Ottawa, Tuesday, February 23, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

United States President Joe Biden listens as Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau delivers his statement during a virtual joint statement following a virtual meeting in Ottawa, Tuesday, February 23, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Prairie provinces, Ontario say no consultation on Canada’s new 2030 emissions target

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau pledged to reduce emissions by 40 to 45 per cent

The Prairie provinces and Ontario say they weren’t consulted about Canada’s higher target to cut greenhouse gas pollution, while some provinces welcome the federal government’s new goal for 2030.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau pledged at a recent global leaders summit to reduce emissions of these heat-trapping gases by 40 to 45 per cent below 2005 levels by the end of the decade.

That’s between four to nine per cent higher than the 36 per cent the Liberal government says it can achieve under existing measures, which is already above the 30 per cent target committed to under the Paris Agreement.

Under the international contract, countries are asked to continue to submit national greenhouse gas reduction targets that are each supposed to be more ambitious than the last.

Environment and Climate Change Minister Jonathan Wilkinson had asked opposition party leaders to provide their thoughts on what the new target should be before Trudeau’s unveiling of the new goal.

But environment ministers in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Ontario say they were not consulted.

In a statement, Alberta Environment Minister Jason Nixon said the government had a chance “to share its climate priorities” with Ottawa before last week’s summit.

“However, we were not consulted about, nor made aware of the details of the Prime Minister’s new emissions reductions target,” he said.

Andrew Buttigieg, a media relations manager and assistant to Ontario Environment Minister Jeff Yurek, said federal ambition relies on the provinces.

Ontario, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Alberta have long been opposed to the federal Liberals’ approach to energy and climate policies, most notably around its charging of a federal carbon price on consumer goods.

A court battle over that move was finally put to rest after the Supreme Court of Canada ruled Ottawa’s backstop was constitutional.

Saskatchewan Environment Minister Warren Kaeding said the new target of up to 45 per cent fewer emissions was “concerning” because of how that ambition may affect the competitiveness of its trade-dependent industries, like agriculture, potash and oil and gas.

He said the Saskatchewan Party government was “surprised” at the new figure and also expressed disappointment after hearing the federal government had inked a new goal of 36 per cent into its recent budget.

“They indicated they were going up, but there was really no fixed number that they were going to provide us.”

Manitoba Conservation and Climate Minister Sarah Guillemard said in a statement the province wasn’t consulted “even as the heavy lifting needed to achieve real and measurable GHG emissions reductions falls on the provinces and territories.”

In the Liberals’ most recent climate plan released last December, it said “collaboration and engagement with provinces and territories will continue leading up to the announcement of an updated nationally determined contribution (NDC),” which is what the national greenhouse gas reduction targets are called.

Although some provinces said they weren’t consulted, others including British Columbia welcomed the higher target.A spokeswoman from Nova Scotia’s department of environment and climate change said it’s always talking to Ottawa about reducing emissions, which it supports.

“With Nova Scotia’s target of 53 per cent below 2005 levels by 2030, we will help Canada reach its commitment,” said spokeswoman Barbara MacLean.

Prince Edward Island’s minister of environment, energy and climate action also welcomed the higher targets.

“With the federal goal now closer to our provincial goal, we are hopeful that this will increase funding available to us to reach these ambitious targets,” Steven Myers said in a statement.

Canada’s new goal is less ambitious than that of the U.S., which promised to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by at least 50 per cent by 2030.

Stephanie Taylor, The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Want to support local journalism? Make a donation here.

Federal Carbon Tax

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

A screenshot of the pathway’s construction. (City of Kelowna)
Okanagan Rail Trail to be extended to downtown Kelowna waterfront

Construction of the pathway is scheduled to begin on Monday, May 10

Jason Townsend wearing his Kelowna Hells Angels prospect patches. (Jason Townsend/Facebook)
Crown stays domestic assault charges against Kelowna Hells Angels prospect

Jason Townsend, 43, was charged in August 2020 with assault and assault by choking

RCMP did not commit offense in arrest which seriously injured Lake Country man, finds IIO. (Phil McLachlan/Capital News/Stock)
Vernon police didn’t use excessive force in domestic takedown: Watchdog

‘One stepped on him and one had his knee in his neck,’ woman told IIO

Central Okanagan recorded 174 cases throughout the week of April 25 to May 1. (BCCDC/Contributed)
Weekly COVID-19 numbers continue to decrease in Central Okanagan

The Central Okanagan had 174 cases from April 25 to May 1

A fifth wheel fire came dangerously close to a Lake Country home Wednesday afternoon. (Lake Country Fire Department photo)
RCMP, neighbours save Lake Country house from fire

Fifth wheel up in flames next to home

Protesters attempt to stop clear-cutting of old-growth trees in Fairy Creek near Port Renfrew. (Will O’Connell photo)
VIDEO: Workers, activists clash at site of Vancouver Island logging operation

Forest license holders asking for independent investigation into incident

A new video from South Okanagan Immigrant and Community Services (SOICS), released May 6 in collaboration with the Okanagan Chambers COVID Response Coalition (#OKWeGotThis), features members of communities across the Okanagan including Oliver, Penticton, Peachland, Kelowna, Vernon, Salmon Arm and Kamloops. (South Okanagan Immigrant and Community Services/Screenshot)
VIDEO: South Okanagan community group releases video addressing racism in the Okanagan

Video begins by using real audio from racist incidents in the Okanagan

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

The monthly totals from Jan.1, 2020 to April 30, 2021 show COVID-19 cases for most Local Health Areas in the North Okanagan-Shuswap, other than Vernon’s with the largest population, staying well below 400. (BC Centre for Disease Control image)
16 months in, COVID cases in North Okanagan-Shuswap areas stay under 1,000

Vernon, with the largest population, hovers under 900 cases since January 2020

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good
Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

Allayah Yoli Thomas had recently turned 12 years old when she died of a suspected drug overdose April 15. (Courtesy of Adriana Londono)
Suspected overdose death of Vancouver Island 12 year old speaks to lack of supports

Allayah Yoli Thomas was found dead by her friend the morning of April 15

More than 6,000 camping reservations in British Columbia were cancelled as a result of a provincial order limiting travel between health regions. (Unsplash)
1 in 4 camping reservations cancelled in B.C. amid COVID-19 travel restrictions

More than 6,000 BC Parks campsite reservations for between April 19 and May 25 have been revoked

B.C. average home price and sales level to 2023, showing steep drop in sales expected next year. (Central 1)
Forecast calls for B.C. home sales to ‘explode,’ then drop off

Average price to rise another 10% in 2021, credit unions say

Salmon Arm Silverbacks forward Sullivan Mack gets a boost into West Kelowna goalie Johnny Derrick from Warriors forward Tyson Jugnauth during West Kelowna’s 5-4 B.C. Hockey League pod play win Wednesday, May 5, at Vernon’s Kal Tire Place. (Tami Quan Photography)
West Kelowna Warriors hold on to edge Silverbacks

Warriors up three with five minutes to go, give up two late goals but end up with 5-4 BCHL win over Salmon Arm

Most Read