The B.C. government announced officers will no longer be required to fill paperwork before moving vehicle from the scene of a minor accident. (Dustin Godfrey/Black Press Media)

Police to no longer write reports for minor fender benders

New legislation to allow police to clear minor crashes quickly

The provincial government has brought in new changes to how police respond to minor collisions as the latest way to keep traffic flowing smoothly.

In a news release Friday the ministry of public safety announced that changes to the Motor Vehicle Act mean that officers will no longer be required to fill out paperwork on fender benders that cause less than $10,000 in damages. Before, police were required to write a report on any damages over $1,000. These reports must be done before vehicles involved can be towed from the scene.

The new rules took effect Friday.

READ MORE: ICBC’s interim 6.3% rate hike approved

“Having traffic back up because of a minor collision where nobody was hurt doesn’t help anyone – and worse, it can lead frustrated drivers to take steps that are unsafe,” said Public Safety Minister Mike Farnworth.

Officers will still be required to file a report with ICBC if a crash is fatal or causes injury.



joti.grewal@bpdigital.ca

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