Penticton becoming hub for modular construction industry

Demand for factory-built homes spurs business growth

The modular housing industry is on the rise in Penticton, with new businesses coming to town to set up plants.

“We’ve had a well-established history of this industry in Penticton and the new companies are certainly taking advantage of the economic climate right now,” said Anthony Haddad, director of development services for Penticton.

Haddad notes there are already well-established modular housing firms in town already, like the long-established Moduline and Metric Modular, which took over the old Britco location.

The latest addition to Penticton is Jandel Homes, an Alberta-based modular home company that expanded here in June.

“My projections are that within five years of being in the Okanagan Valley, we should be at the same volumes as Alberta. I see very large potential here,” said Mark Huchulak, president and CEO of Jandel Homes.

Jandel joins other companies, like the Radec group that have also chosen to take advantage of what Penticton has to offer.

Penticton also offers easy access to transportation routes serving the Okanagan and beyond.

“I think that is one of the big benefits of locating in Penticton for these types of businesses and others, the superior access to a number of different transportation networks,” said Haddad.

Increased demand is fuelling big business, which is resulting in strong employment growth and spurring the local economy.

Metric Modular is also facing substantial growth and is hiring at its Penticton plant.

Related: Modular construction plant rebounds to 50 employees

“Penticton has been the natural hub for the modular home industry for years, supporting the Okanagan Valley,” said Stephen Branch, president of Metric Modular. “We now have teamed up with our sister company Triple M Housing to provide both commercial products and single-family homes from this hub.”

Innovative designs and wider applications are also fuelling the growth of modular housing, according to Haddad.

“We’re seeing the modular housing industry innovating in the types of housing. It’s not just single-family houses that can be built with this type of construction,” he said. “We’re seeing a variety of different options through carriage houses, multi-family developments, even on the commercial side; hotels for example.”

The Coast Oliver Hotel, Haddad added, was built with modular construction and recently opened.

“The array of housing types and development types that the modular home sector can provide for, provides an efficient construction process, resulting in lower costs and providing a more affordable housing type within the Okanagan,” said Haddad.

Designs have continually improved to meet demand, according to Walter Fontinha, sales manager of Moduline.

“The modular business is growing because the look of the homes have changed in the last 15 years. They look a lot more residential. Modular homes are being more accepted within city limits among site-built homes,” said Fontinha.

Related: Moduline retirees reflect on time with company

An example of that, said Haddad, is the Bridgewater development in Penticton, which is close to being built out.

“There has been a lot of interest in the new developments in using modular construction,” said Haddad. “With the growing construction industry in the whole Okanagan, the ability for this type of construction method to provide for a wide range of housing is a huge opportunity that we are seeing some new companies invest in Penticton for.”


Steve Kidd
Senior reporter, Penticton Western News
Email me or message me on Facebook
Follow us on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram

Just Posted

Black Mountain / sntsk‘il’ntən Regional Park starts to take shape

Student volunteers from three local schools work on trail building project

Open burning permitted again in Kamloops Fire Centre

Low fire rating prompts decision throughout Kamloops Fire Centre

B.C. Rural Party co-founder rebukes pro-NDP accusation

Telkwa Mayor Darcy Repen disputes being NDP campaign supporter

Incumbent trustee candidate reassesses SOGI 123 impact

Lee-Ann Tiede says mandated student inclusiveness program has some issues

Lake Country Chamber of Commerce to host All Candidates Forum

Residents are being asked to submit questions to be asked

VIDEO: Messages of hope, encouragement line bars of B.C. bridge

WARNING: This story contains references to suicide and may not be appropriate for all audiences.

The longest week: Carolinas worn out by Florence

Frustration and sheer exhaustion are building as thousands of people wait to go home seven days after the storm began battering the coast.

Vancouver councillors move ahead with policy for duplexes on detached home lots

Mayor Gregor Robertson says the decision is another step toward adding homes in the city for the so-called “missing middle.”

Canada’s goal is to play in a medal game at World Cup in Spain

The 2014 women’s world basketball championships were a coming out party for Canada.

World Anti-Doping Agency reinstates Russia

There was no mention of Russia publicly accepting a state-sponsored conspiracy to help its athletes win Olympic medals by doping.

Nanaimo’s Tilray pot stock continues rising, firm now worth more than $21 billion US

The B.C. company’s shares have risen more than 1,000 % since its initial public offering in July

Fresh-faced Flames fend off Canucks 4-1

Vancouver drops second straight NHL exhibition contest

VIDEO: B.C. deer struggles with life-preserver caught in antlers

Campbell River resident captures entangled deer on camera

Most Read