The CN Rail line as it moves towards the Day family house in Oyama.

Lake Country sued for ‘fair compensation’ by Oyama homeowners

Colin Day and his wife have filed a civil suit in B.C Supreme Court after their land was expropriated for Okanagan Rail Trail.

The District of Lake Country is being sued in a dispute over a portion of the Okanagan Rail Trail that passes through an Oyama property.

Colin Day and his wife Moira have filed a civil suit in BC Supreme Court asking for compensation after a portion of their land was expropriated by the Inter-jurisdictional Development Team, which represented Lake Country in its purchase of the old CN Rail corridor.

The corridor passes through the Day’s lakeshore property on Wood Lake, a 740-foot stretch of the trail that comes within several metres of their family home, which they have owned since 1985.

In documents filed in supreme court, the Day family says loss in value, damages and disruption caused by the rail trail “significantly exceeds the advance payment compensation made…in the amount of $286,500.”

When contacted Wednesday, Day said he was in negotiations with the Inter-jurisdictional Development Team to come to a fair settlement when his land was expropriated, forcing him to file the lawsuit.

Previously the Day family purchased the right of first refusal for the corridor moving through its land.

“We’ve tried to find a solution to the problem,” he said. “We offered to put the trail in the orchard and they didn’t want to do that. We offered to put half the trail in the orchard and half on the right-of-way and they refused to do that. We offered to sell the whole property at market value and then they could do what they want. We’re trying to find a solution and that didn’t happen for whatever reason.”

In a statement, the District of Lake Country said that it made a payment to the Days based on an accredited appraiser’s report of the value of the lands and the impacts to the Day’s property, noting the district would file its response with the courts within the proper time frame.

Lake Country Mayor James Baker says the lawsuit comes as a surprise to him, saying he thought the matter was being dealt with by the Inter-jurisdictional Development Team (IDT)

“When we started the process we were told the sale would be free of encumbrances,” said Baker. “This is a surprise. We weren’t party to what the negotiations were and everything was confidential.”

Baker referred further questions to the IDT, being led by the real estate division at the City of Kelowna and Lake Country’s chief administrative officer.

Lake Country resident Ron Volk says the Lake Country council knew of the issues surrounding the Day property and he filed Freedom of Information requests to Lake Country, asking that the amount paid to expropriate the Day property be released.

“We tried to warn people before the referendum that this is going to cost the district a bundle,” said Volk. “There are a bunch of us that voted no in the referendum that are still bitter because of the true costs of buying this. The taxpayer will end up paying. It’s a terrible situation.”

Day is a former Kelowna city councillor who moved to Lake Country and bought the property in 1985. The lot is 10.33 acres with the rail trail taking up 740 feet as it passes through the parcel of land

The District of Lake Country, along with the City of Kelowna and the North Okanagan Regional District combined to purchase the former rail corridor from CN for $22 million.

“This is very upsetting for my wife and my family,” said Day. “We have a beautiful spot that has been changed with public access right into our yard. If you live in a rural orchard and you own 12 acres of land, you don’t expect people to be walking that close to your house. It’s a real change in lifestyle. We just want fair compensation, fair market value.”

No date has been set for the civil case.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Westbank First Nation Grand Chief Noll Derriksan passes away

Derriksan was 79 at the time of his passing

Central Okanagan school superintendent addresses technology’s impact on students

Physical and mental well being for students key themes during Kevin Kaardal’s presentation

Lake Country approves 5.88 per cent property tax increase

The average home assessed at $711,000 will have to pay an extra $123 per year

Kelowna to introduce new strategy for community education about supportive housing

The model seeks to enhance community engagement, accessibility and transparency

GoFundMe campaign started for young Kelowna girl in need of service dog

Alena suffered from an in utero MCA stroke, that affected most of the right side of her brain

VIDEO: B.C. senior recalls ‘crazy’ wartime decision to grab bear cub from den

Henry Martens – now 96 – says he was lucky to be alive after youthful decision to enter a bear’s den

Gas drops below a dollar per litre in Penticton

Two stores in Penticton have gas below a dollar.

Pawsative Pups: You have a new puppy, now what?

Lisa Davies is a new columnist for Black Press who writes about dog training

Loans or gifts? Judge rules woman must pay B.C. man back $7K

B.C. judge rules that woman must pay back more than $7,000 in advanced funds to man

VIDEO: Outpouring of worldwide support for bullied Australian boy

Australian actor Hugh Jackman said ‘you are stronger than you know, mate’

Sewer service planned for South Okanagan community of Kaleden

Regional District of Okanagan Similkameen plans to extend Okanagan Falls system into Kaleden

‘A horror show:’ Ex-employee shares experience at problematic Chilliwack seniors’ home

Workers are paid below industry standard at all Retirement Concepts facilities

Forest industry protests northern B.C. caribou protection deal

B.C. Mining Association supports federal-Indigenous plan

Youth-led report calls on B.C. government to create plan to end youth homelessness

There are no dedicated programs for youth homelessness at federal, provincial level, report says

Most Read