Oyama Lake, as pictured April 28, 2021, is a water source for residents during high irrigation periods. (Véronique Gagnon photo)

Oyama Lake, as pictured April 28, 2021, is a water source for residents during high irrigation periods. (Véronique Gagnon photo)

Lack of rain dries up Lake Country water supply

District asking residents only to irrigate when absolutely necessary

An abnormally dry spring has left Lake Country looking to preserve its precious resource.

The District is asking residents to only irrigate when absolutely necessary due to low water levels.

“If your irrigation is on a timer, please take the time to check the system over to make sure your only watering if and when it’s necessary, typically one to two times per week is reasonable for this time of year,” the district said. “Efforts to conserve water now will help minimize potential water restrictions later in the year.”

Blending of water sources traditionally takes place during the spring freshet and is implemented to maintain water quality. Water sources that may experience blended water supply this time of year are:

• Oyama Creek water source customers – as temperatures and flows increase, more creek water is used and customers may notice increased colour in the water

• Beaver Lake water source customers

Both Oyama Creek and Beaver Lake water sources continue to be on a water quality advisory. Oyama residents at the north end and east side of Wood Lake receive water from Oyama Lake during high irrigation months and all other times of the year these residents receive Kalamalka Lake water.

READ MORE: Algal bloom found on Lake Country’s Wood Lake

READ MORE: Yelling over phone won’t speed up service: District of Lake Country


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