Kelowna’s Toys “R” Us joins Salvation Army toy drive

More than 600,000 toys will be donated throughout the country

Toys “R” Us will donate over 700,000 toys this year. Courtesy photo.

Toys “R” Us Canada has taken new heights with the donation of more than 600,000 toys to several of The Salvation Army’s annual toy drives. Kelowna’s Toys “R” Us is included in the massive toy donations that will be distributed throughout the country.

“We believe play is a right for children, so it’s incredibly rewarding for us to be able to make this donation and spread the joy of play this Christmas,” says Melanie Teed-Murch, president of Toys “R” Us Canada. “We commend The Salvation Army for its efforts to support children and families in need and are proud to align ourselves with its toy drive initiative.”

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Each year, The Salvation Army’s toy drives provide children in need with a toy for Christmas. In addition, more than 100,000 toys were donated to Bay Street Fore a Cause, in support of various children’s-based charities. Known for bringing joy to children through the magic of play, Toys “R” Us Canada’s donation spreads joy and Christmas cheer far and wide across the country to the children who need it most.

The Toys “R” Us Canada donation consists of more than 600,000 unwrapped toys that were distributed to Salvation Army community centres across all Canadian provinces – Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Newfoundland, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Prince Edward Island, Quebec and Saskatchewan.

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“The Salvation Army couldn’t extend its reach as far without the support of community allies like Toys “R” Us Canada,” said Lt-Colonel John Murray, Secretary for Communications for The Salvation Army. “This donation helps us put a toy under the Christmas tree for thousands of children across the country, and we’re truly grateful for that.”

Further to this donation, Toys “R” Us Canada has also donated more than 100,000 toys to Toronto-based not-for-profit, Bay Street Fore A Cause, which supports various children’s-based charitable groups, like Big Brothers and Big Sisters of Toronto, throughout the Greater Toronto Area.

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