Central Okanagan Public Schools students got a taste of what it’s like to deal with a code blue situation at Kelowna General Hospital on Friday as part of the Health Care Career Day. (Justin Schneider)

Kelowna high school students react to code blue at KGH

The mock code blue was part of a career day at Kelowna’s hospital

The least stressful code blue in KGH’s history was successfully handled by a group of Kelowna high school students.

The group was presented with the mock code blue drill; Central Okanagan public school students were tasked with role-playing a nurse, doctor and other members of the medical team in order to gain an understanding of the different career paths offered at Kelowna General Hospital.

Health Care Career Day, held at KGH for roughly 10 years, had 90 students participate in lectures, sessionals and more Friday.

Okanagan Mission Secondary Grade 12 students Chris Rogers and Jenna Robinson have big aspirations for their career paths.

READ MORE: New tech training program at Okanagan College inspires high school students

“I know I’m going to be entering general sciences next year. I have an idea of what I want I to go into, which pharmacology …but I wanted to see what else is out there and learn more about the hospital,” Robinson said.

“I was really interested in the medical physicist when they started talking, I didn’t even know that was a job.”

Rogers, who wants to be a neurosurgeon, said the different employees seemed passionate about their jobs.

Each participated in the code blue, which means a cardiac arrest.

“I can definitely see how it’s a stressful situation but the importance to be trained properly,” Robinson said.

READ MORE: Kelowna students leave the classroom for the workforce

By offering this career day, it allows the students to not only find the different career paths in the hospital, but it also shows students how to get to each path, said school district program co-ordinator Sarah Wood.

“They don’t just have to take traditional pathways, they can start in the general sciences, or general program and branch out into more specific programs as they find their interests,” she said.

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