Hundreds attended the second day of the event today (Connor Trembley - Kelowna Capital News file)

Hundreds attend first annual climate and food conference in Kelowna

Over 25 industry experts spoke at the two-day event

Creating sustainable farming practices and researching new ways to grow more climate-resilient crops were two of the main issues at the Climate and Food Systems Summit, taking place in Kelowna.

The two-day event saw over 25 agricultural scientists and researchers from across North America come together in the Central Okanagan to brainstorm sustainable farming solutions in an era of intensified climate change.

READ MORE: LETTER: On the future of salmon farming in B.C.

Event co-host Tamara McLellan said the idea of the summit started when she and another colleague decided there needed to be a more meaningful change in the agricultural field.

“I left the traditional agricultural field and moved into a more philanthropic world to work on more humanitarian issues like food security,” she said.

“The other co-host, Brena Tjaden, also left the conventional agricultural world. She then spent two years studying the organics market and soil health. That led to regenerative agriculture, which what this event is all about.”

Through funds raised by the event, the two partners hope to expand their existing educational workshops around inter-cropping and carbon-friendly agricultural practices for farmers across Canada.

There is also talk of a possible organization forming from the event which will put pressure on local governments to invest more in sustainable farming practices.

Brian Smoliak, an agricultural expert and speaker at the event, said industry partners need to work more efficiently together to find agricultural solutions for farmers who have been increasingly impacted by climate change.

“When we look out there, we haven’t seen as much progress to reduce emissions (from farming) as we might hope,” he said.”

“We’re going to have to do some adaptation in farming moving forward. So, were here at the event to find out from people what are the tools and strategies within agriculture that will help farmers thrive for years to come.”

Locally sourcing and reusing agricultural material, mitigating the amount of agricultural waste that enters landfills and influencing big corporations like Starbucks to make sustainable agriculture business contacts were other topics discussed at the event.

According to the United Nations, pasture and crops have taken up 37 per cent of the earth’s land area since 1999.


@connortrembley
connor.trembley@kelownacapnews.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Crews repair damage caused by water main break in Lake Country

The water main broke during construction last year

70-year-old Kelowna man arrested after report of shots fired inside a home

The incident occurred just after 4 p.m. on March 28 in Kelowna

RV goes up in flames in West Kelowna

West Kelowna fire crews responded to the fire around 4 a.m. on March 30

First responders continue to rally in support of Kelowna health care workers

Pandosy Street was packed with supporters for the second night in a row

Canada expands 75% wage subsidy to COVID-19 affected businesses of all sizes: Trudeau

Program will provide up to $847 per week for each worker

Cruise ships, one with COVID-19 on board, carry Canadians covertly through Panama Canal

Zaandam, Rotterdam pass through canal under cover of darkness in face of local protests

Okanagan business pumped to expand amid COVID-19

Co-op has plans for a second Vernon fuel station on Okanagan Landing Road

LifeLabs reducing public hours as it assists with COVID-19 testing

Coronavirus tests not done at B.C. patient centres, referrals only

24,000 Canadian Forces members ready for COVID-19 response: Defence Minister

No direct requests made by premiers yet, national defence minister says

IN DEPTH: How B.C. emptied its hospitals to prepare for COVID-19

Thousands of beds have been freed up, but patients and seniors have had to sacrifice

‘Nothing concrete’: Tenants, landlords lack details after B.C. unveils COVID-19 rental aid

Single mom in Golden says she’s already going to the food bank after being laid off

B.C. is seeing the highest rate of COVID-19 recovery in Canada, and there’s a few reasons why

British Columbia was one of the first to see rise in COVID-19 cases, and has also switched up testing

Most Read