Four things ‘not’ to do if you run into Prince Harry and Meghan in B.C.

Like many in British Columbia, you may be worried about running into Prince Harry and Meghan in your local dairy aisle, and not knowing how to behave properly.

Here are some things you definitely should NOT do, according to the BBC.

• Don’t touch them. Traditionally one may only touch a Royal if a hand is offered.

• Don’t ask for an autograph. Members of the royal family aren’t supposed to sign autographs out of worry they could be forged.

• Don’t ask for a selfie. Taking a selfie would require turning your back to a Royal and that’s a no-no.

Finally, the BBC is also reporting the couple is considering an invasion of privacy suit against a paparazzi photographer who snapped Meghan and Archie out for a walk with their two dogs in Horth Hill Regional Park on Vancouver island, Monday morning.

With that in mind, you probably don’t want to take their picture, either.

Curtsies are not required, nor expected, when meeting a Royal, but they are not out-of-line. A Government of Canada website with information on royal conduct describes an acceptable curtsy – should the spirit move you – as the right foot placed behind the left heel, with the knees bent slightly. Men may make neck bows, which are just a little more than a nod of the head.

While Harry is still a prince, neither he nor Meghan are to be addressed as Royal Highness. (They do retain the titles, however.) They are called Duke and Duchess of Sussex and subsequently “Sir” and “Ma’am”.

While the couple doesn’t ordinarily use last names, if you get stuck you could probably just refer to them as Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor’s mom and dad.

Related: Anti-tax group calls for no federal funds for Prince Harry, Meghan Markle while in Canada

Related: Harry and Meghan can ‘live a little less formal’ in Canada, says Monarchist League

To report a typo, email:
publisher@similkameenspotlight.com
.



andrea.demeer@similkameenspotlight.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Royal family

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

UBC Okanagan to host Festival of Ideas with BC’s lieutenant governor

The inaugural event will feature a panel discussion with Janet Austin, B.C.’s lieutenant governor

AlleyCATS Okanagan: Pet of the week

Meet Softy a five-year-old Himalayan cat available for adoption

Largest aircraft to operate at YLW begins service to Toronto this summer

The Boeing 767-300ER will increase seat availability for flights to Toronto by 40 per cent

B.C. budget fails to ‘excite’ Kelowna business community

Chamber says Budget 2020 lacks a clearly defined competitiveness strategy

Kelowna divers ready to take on 2020 B.C. Winter Games

The athletes have been training four days a week

Galchenyuk nets shootout winner as Wild edge Canucks 4-3

Vancouver tied with Calgary for second spot in NHL’s Pacific Division

B.C.’s soda drink tax will help kids lose weight, improve health, says doctor

Dr. Tom Warshawski says studies show sugary drinks contribute to obesity

A&W employees in Ladysmith get all-inclusive vacation for 10 years of service

Kelly Frenchy, Katherine Aleck, and Muriel Jack are headed on all-expenses-paid vacations

B.C. mom’s complaint about ‘R word’ in children’s ministry email sparks review

In 2020, the ‘R’ word shouldn’t be used, Sue Robins says

B.C., federal ministers plead for meeting Wet’suwet’en dissidents

Scott Fraser, Carolyn Bennett says they can be in Smithers Thursday

EDITORIAL: Revisiting cannabis regulations

Recent retail license application has brought up concerns about present policy in Summerland

Guidelines regulate Summerland cannabis stores

The municipality’s policy, 300.6 establishes the 50-metre buffer zone around schools and parks

Penticton MLA urges government to address fatal stretch of Hwy 97

“People are being injured and lives are being lost on this stretch of highway.” - MLA Dan Ashton

Most Read