Determining what constitutes heritage

Social, spiritual and cultural values are the building blocks of community’s heritage.

Heritage workshop participants pour over historical photos in Lake Country. The workshop is part of the province’s mandate to get local governments to better manage historic places within their jurisdiction.

The District of Lake Country has released a report detailing how historic buildings in Lake Country will be valued when it comes to preserving the heritage of the community.

The Heritage Values Workshop report was released last week, detailing the criteria of what makes a building a heritage building and what values are used in identifying the historic value of a building or homestead.

The report recognizes that the age of a site is not its most valuable asset; instead, it is what a place says about the social, spiritual and cultural values of a community at a particular time which should be conserved.

The report was put together after the district and the Lake Country Heritage and Cultural Society held a heritage workshop, which was facilitated by the provincial government earlier this year.

Part of the province’s mandate is to build capacity at the local government level so that communities can better manage historic places within their jurisdiction.

“The focus of the workshop was to gather local knowledge about what major factors and processes influenced the Lake Country’s heritage resources and made it the vibrant community it is today,” said Steve Schaffrick, director of community and customer services.

“With a wide variety of community stakeholders participating in the workshop, the district gained a better understanding of what parts of the community people value most.”

The one‐day workshop brought community members together to identify heritage values and begin to identify historic places and what should be conserved.

From there, decisions can be made on how to best conserve places that the community identifies as embodying heritage values.

It will also layout how to respond to these values in planning for the future development of the District of Lake Country.

“The workshop enabled the district to learn from the past to plan for the future,” said Shaffrick. “This is the first step towards developing a heritage conservation program for Lake Country.”

The district, along with the Lake Country Heritage and Cultural Society, will now be working on a list of key sites that will be presented to council for further action and identification.

“The workshop inspired some great discussion on community identity,” said Shannon Jorgenson, of the Lake Country Heritage and Cultural Society.

“It was a terrific opportunity to celebrate the things that make Lake Country unique.”

A copy of the Heritage Values Workshop Report and photos from the workshop are available at www.okanaganway.ca/municipal by clicking on the Quick Link for Heritage.

Just Posted

Okanagan Wildfires: An afternoon update on wildfires and evacuations

A Sunday afternoon look at the major wildfires impacting the Okanagan and Similkameen.

BC Wildfire merges Mt. Eneas and Munro Lake fires

Large plume of smoke seen over the fire was a controlled event

Motorcyclist taken to hospital following crash near Vernon

Extent of injuries not yet known following motorcycle in ditch on Commonage Road Sunday, July 22

All-Indigenous teams break new ground, making BC Games history

This is the first time there have been dedicated Indigenous teams at the BC Summer Games

Lower Mainland teams battle for baseball gold at BC Games

Vancouver Coastal squeaked out a 3-2 win against Fraser Valley

The Northern Secwepemc te Qelmucw people signed an agreement-in-principle with the B.C. government

The signing ceremony, at the Eliza Archie Memorial School, was 25 years in the making

Canada to resettle dozens of White Helmets and their families from Syria

There are fears the volunteers would become a target for government troops

Francesco Molinari wins British Open at Carnoustie

It is his first win at a major and the first by an Italian

Government sets full-time salary range for Justin Trudeau’s nanny

At its top range, the order works out to a rate of $21.79 per hour, assuming a 40-hour work week

Mediation talks break off in casino strike

Gateway and BCGEU have no new date set for mediation

ZONE 2: Okanagan twins bring ultimate competition to the BC Games

Brothers Connor and Holden Berrisford are each other’s main motivators

Most Read