High water and storms caused damage to Penticton’s lakeshore this spring, including the Kiwanis Walking Pier. Costs for the repairs are now starting to come in. (File photo)

Damage from spring floods estimated at over $600,000 in Penticton

The province is expected to cover more than half the costs of repairing Penticton’s lakeshore

Repairing the damage from the high lake levels and storms this spring isn’t going to be cheap.

A report being presented to city council tomorrow estimates the overall cost of repairs at up to $620,264, of which the Province of B.C. is expected to cover a little more than half. The city’s portion of the costs is estimated at up to $308,853.

The list of damages includes paver-stone walkways adjacent to the waterfront that were undermined by wave action, repairs to the asphalt in the Yacht Club parking lot and repairs to areas along the boardwalk and beach, including replacement of up to four centimetres of sand at various locations.

The SS Sicamous, which was lifted 24 inches off its sand bed by the high water, also requires repairs. To make sure the boat resettled evenly, fresh sand was washed under it, with the result that the boat now sits about 18 inches higher than before. The sand bed needs further work to support the boat evenly and all the connecting structures, including the electric elevator on the western side of the boat, are out of alignment.

One of the biggest jobs will be the repair of the Kiwanis walking pier, which suffered severe damage after being buffeted by storm-driven waves. The full cost of repairing the pier isn’t known, though city staff say insurance will cover the cost of any repairs not covered by the province.

City engineer Ian Chapman said they are waiting for the results of an engineering inspection before setting out costs and a timetable for repair.

That inspection, he explained, couldn’t be done until the lake level dropped low enough so inspectors could get down underneath it to see how bad the damage was.

“If it is a relatively modest amount of work, we could probably get to it next year. But if it is far more extensive than that, it could go into 2019,” said Chapman.

Just Posted

Accident backs up Glenmore

Commuters in Lake Country, between Vernon and Kelowna, advised to avoid area

Police incident ends peacefully in Glenmore

After the area was evacuated, police were able to calm a distraught 50-year-old man

UBCO students to get medical cannabis coverage

Kelowna - The pilot project will be implemented in April

Lake Country tourism centre calls for better emergency plan

The tourist centre says it was relied on to provide information during the summer floods and fires

Kelowna art camp held for spring break

Classes for children are available from March 19 to 29

VIDEO: Top 10 B.C. budget highlights

The NDP is focusing on childcare, affordable housing and speeding up the elimination of MSP premiums

Canucks blow three goal lead, lose to Avalanche in overtime

Vancouver struggled on the penalty kill, as Colorado scored all five goals on the powerplay

Widow of avalanche victim sues Golden lodge operator

A woman from Alberta is suing guides, their mountain guide association and the lodge operator for negligence

BC BUDGET: NDP hope to nix court delays with $15 million cash influx

Union says funding could stop sheriffs from leaving for higher paid jobs

Thompson, Chilcotin Steelhead Trout in danger of extinction

‘Once it’s gone, it’s not coming back’ says longtime Steelhead advocate Steve Rice.

Cattlemen urge B.C. to prevent erosion caused during 2017 wildfire season

Other concerns are fencing restoration and repair, and a lack of feed for cattle.

Skier air lifted from Cherryville

Elementary school students get a close look at emergency services in action

Patrick Brown’s Tory leadership bid fate looms

Brown’s bid to for Tory leadership to be decided on Wednesday

Alberta shrugs off B.C. legal challenge on wine ban

The potential fine Alberta faces for violating free trade rules according to economic development minister

Most Read