B.C. Premier John Horgan and Washington Gov. Jay Inslee arrive for annual Cascadia conference in Vancouver, Oct. 10, 2018. They have agreed to coordinate the permanent switch to daylight saving time. (B.C. government)

B.C. set to change law to stick with daylight saving time

No change for Sunday’s ‘fall back’ or next ‘spring forward’

The B.C. government is introducing its long-promised bill to move to daylight saving time Thursday, but people will still be moving their clocks back this Sunday and forward again next March 8.

Attorney General David Eby confirmed that the legislation is coming, but reminded people interested in the change that they shouldn’t expect any action until next fall at the earliest.

“There are a number of different issues, and one of the issues that has been raised in the engagement is ensuring that we’re in a consistent time zone down the west coast of the United States,” Eby told reporters at the B.C. legislature Wednesday. “It’s a huge market for us and so that’s definitely a consideration, as is the reality of many British Columbians with small kids that grapple with this.”

RELATED: B.C., Yukon agree to set clocks with western U.S. states

RELATED: More than 90% of B.C. residents want to stop switching

U.S. states need approval of the U.S. Congress to change their times, even after California, Oregon and Washington adopt their own switch to year-round daylight time. B.C. Premier John Horgan and Yukon Premier Sandy Silver met in September and agreed that staying in step with the western U.S. is essential for airlines, emergency and other services.

In B.C., areas of the Kootenays follow Mountain time to reflect economic ties with Alberta. The Peace region already uses Pacific daylight time all year round, putting it on the same time as B.C. in the summer and with Alberta in the winter.


@tomfletcherbc
tfletcher@blackpress.ca

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