In 1893, the Barr brothers bought what was to become the Rainbow Ranche when land on “the Commonage” was put up for sale. They sold the property to Northcote H. Caesar and his partner T. F. Valentine. There was no irrigation so they grew hay, wheat and raised a few sheep. Caesar and Valentine dissolved their partnership in 1899 and in 1905, N. H. Caesar sold most of the property (save the south west corner) to F. Pow. Mr. Pow sold it again to J. E. McAllister and Frank Hewer. They planted the first orchard in 1906. By 1909, James Goldie and R. S. Dormer bought Hewer’s share. James Goldie managed the Rainbow Ranche for 40 years until it was sub-divided in 1948. Ultimately there were about 125 acres of fruit, mostly apples, as well as pasture and rangeland. In 1909, ditch irrigation was available (from the Okanagan Valley Land Company). The Rainbow Ranche was the first large acreage of fruit to be planted in Lake Country. Mr. Goldie’s daughter, Mrs. Nancy McDonnell, still lives in the Ranche house. ~Lake Country Museum & Archives

In 1893, the Barr brothers bought what was to become the Rainbow Ranche when land on “the Commonage” was put up for sale. They sold the property to Northcote H. Caesar and his partner T. F. Valentine. There was no irrigation so they grew hay, wheat and raised a few sheep. Caesar and Valentine dissolved their partnership in 1899 and in 1905, N. H. Caesar sold most of the property (save the south west corner) to F. Pow. Mr. Pow sold it again to J. E. McAllister and Frank Hewer. They planted the first orchard in 1906. By 1909, James Goldie and R. S. Dormer bought Hewer’s share. James Goldie managed the Rainbow Ranche for 40 years until it was sub-divided in 1948. Ultimately there were about 125 acres of fruit, mostly apples, as well as pasture and rangeland. In 1909, ditch irrigation was available (from the Okanagan Valley Land Company). The Rainbow Ranche was the first large acreage of fruit to be planted in Lake Country. Mr. Goldie’s daughter, Mrs. Nancy McDonnell, still lives in the Ranche house. ~Lake Country Museum & Archives

A look back at Lake Country’s history

Rainbow Ranche

In 1893, the Barr brothers bought what was to become the Rainbow Ranche when land on “the Commonage” was put up for sale. They sold the property to Northcote H. Caesar and his partner T. F. Valentine. There was no irrigation so they grew hay, wheat and raised a few sheep. Caesar and Valentine dissolved their partnership in 1899 and in 1905, N. H. Caesar sold most of the property (save the south west corner) to F. Pow. Mr. Pow sold it again to J. E. McAllister and Frank Hewer. They planted the first orchard in 1906. By 1909, James Goldie and R. S. Dormer bought Hewer’s share.

James Goldie managed the Rainbow Ranche for 40 years until it was sub-divided in 1948. Ultimately there were about 125 acres of fruit, mostly apples, as well as pasture and rangeland. In 1909, ditch irrigation was available (from the Okanagan Valley Land Company).

The Rainbow Ranche was the first large acreage of fruit to be planted in Lake Country. Mr. Goldie’s daughter, Mrs. Nancy McDonnell, still lives in the Ranche house.

~Lake Country Museum & Archives

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