Young: New book offers insights into small business survival

…it’s a book that finally unlocks the realities of founding and operating a small business in Canada.

Recently, I reconnected with Tim Young, an old friend from Regina.

I had not realized Tim and his wife, Joann, had moved to the Okanagan 20-plus years ago and in that time assembled a history of small business ownerships since leaving dear old Regina, our prairie roots.

Tim, now in his 50s, updated me about completing his first book about small business enterprises based on his and his wife’s experiences for the last two decades.

Tim had arrived at the crossroads of nurturing the concept for this book, whereas the time had come for it to be written.

With the two hands it took me to hold its 450 pages, the book is a small business jewel of information, experiences and learning.

And as many critics have offered, it’s a book that finally unlocks the realities of founding and operating a small business in Canada.

Tim advised me that the core idea for the book came when he noticed that many small enterprises were employing very few of the management practices that larger successful enterprises had been using for many years.

Tim envisaged that he could write a book that would bridge that management practices gap.

For me, I have been involved in the world of entrepreneurship and small business creation for close to 30 years and have heard, identified and pondered the plethora of commentary about entrepreneurial/small business startups and short duration existence coupled with failed outcomes.

After completing his degree at the University of Regina, Tim entered corporate Canada working for Sears Canada, Sask Tel and embraced a few franchise operations that gave him a solid background and foundation of the world of small business.

Tim’s book is called How Much Money Can I Make, now on the shelves with a few book signing launches already completed.

With six chapters and 15 appendices, I was overwhelmed with the detail and thoroughness of the book.

It reads not like a single university business course, but a business degree program covering everything you wanted to know about small business if you were standing at the threshold of the ‘start-up’ journey.

Tim has lived that experience many times over in his life, and never lost the realization that the story of small business has to be told.

You can find Tim’s book at Mosaic Books in downtown Kelowna and I encourage everyone with an interest in small business and entrepreneurship to consider purchasing it.

You may have to hold it with two hands, but you won’t be sorry to have this new bible of business to assist you in your own entrepreneurial journey.

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