A view of downtown Toronto from the CN Tower

Canada’s banks say they are not affected by Heartbleed bug

'Canadians can continue to bank with confidence,' says Bankers' Association, while major sites like Yahoo and OKCupid were affected.

Canada’s banks say its customers’ online information is safe from the just-discovered Heartbleed security bug, which has reportedly affected 500,000 servers and laid vulnerable sensitive “private data such as usernames, passwords, and credit card numbers” (CNET).

Heartbleed was publicly discovered – or unveiled – on Monday, and has reportedly existed for two years.

But on Wednesday, the Canadian Bankers’ Association said none of the country’s banks have been affected by the bug and then said, “Canadians can continue to bank with confidence.”

“As part of a normal course of business, the banks actively monitor their networks and continuously conduct routine maintenance to help ensure that online threats do not harm their servers or disrupt service to customers,” the CBA said.

“As always, bank customers should take the usual steps to protect themselves from fraud. This includes monitoring bank and credit card statements looking for any unusual activity, protecting PINs and passwords and changing PINs and passwords periodically.”

TD spokesperson Barbara Timmins told Global News that their bank “is adding additional, layered security, so customers can conduct their banking securely and without their data being at risk.”

Still, all online users have been advised to change the passwords and be cautious with their online activity over the next few days.

Heartbleed is “a massive vulnerability in popular web encryption software called OpenSSL” – according to Vox.com – and it has led to admitted affects on sites like Yahoo and OKCupid, although both companies say they are either fixing the bug or have fixed it.

Yahoo’s properties also include its Homepage, Search, Mail, Finance, Sports, Food, Tech, as well as sharing/blogging entities Flickr and Tumblr.

(LastPass has posted a search field to determine if individual sites have been affected, or may be vulnerable.)

Vox reported on Wednesday that affected servers – through OpenSSL – make up approximately 66 per cent of those on the Web.

Just Posted

Three UBC Okanagan students awarded women in tech scholarships

Computer science and math students hope the award will inspire others

Missing Kelowna woman, Cassy Miller found dead

Miller went missing Nov. 6 and was found 10 days later

Rockets break four game losing streak in Edmonton

The Rockets defeated the Oil Kings 3-1

Okanagan Floral Design students create elaborate Christmas arrangements

The students are making the floral arrangements as part of the Homes for the Holidays tour

Saving salmon: B.C. business man believes hatcheries can help bring back the fish

Tony Allard worked with a central coast First Nation to enhance salmon stocks

Crash closes Highway 33 south of Kelowna

Estimated time of re-opening is 7:30 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 18

High-end B.C. house prices dropping, but no relief at lower levels

But experts say home ownership remains out of reach for many for middle- and lower-income families

Worker killed in collision at B.C. coal mine

Vehicle collision occurred at approximately 10:45 a.m. this morning

B.C. asking for tips on ‘dirty money’ in horse racing, real estate, luxury cars

Action follows a Peter German report on money laundering in B.C. casinos

Canadian dead more than a week after plane crash in Guyana: Global Affairs

Global Affairs said it couldn’t provide further details on the identity of the Canadian citizen

Children between 6 and 9 eligible for $1,200 RESP grant from province

BC Ministry of Education is reminding residents to apply before the deadline

Victoria spent $30,000 to remove John A. Macdonald statue

Contentious decision sparked controversy, apology from mayor

South region forestry workers nearly in legal strike position

Talks broke down between USW and IFLRA, resulting in booking out of provincial mediator

Most Read