Personalized treatments for Okanagan cancer patients

POG begins by sequencing a patient’s entire genome then specifically target treatments and care to the individual.

  • Sep. 29, 2015 7:00 p.m.

The next evolution in the standard of cancer care is here and patients in the Southern Interior and across the province are set to benefit from it.

Patients enrolled in the BC Cancer Agency’s Personalized Onco-Genomics (POG) program are benefiting now from precision treatment strategies that are customized specifically for them, thus eliminating the painful and debilitating side effects of toxic treatments that are less effective.

POG, the first and only program of its kind in the world, is greatly improving the quality of life for patients across British Columbia.

Expert researchers are sharing exciting updates on one of the BC Cancer Agency’s most promising research initiatives and its growth in Kelowna.

Dr. Janessa Laskin, is a medical oncologist at the BC Cancer Agency. Recently she spend time training oncologists at the Sindi Ahluwalia Hawkins Centre for the Southern Interior on the POG program.

“We know that when we base cancer treatment on a large population of patients, it doesn’t always work for some individuals,” Dr. Laskin said. ”POG is trying to change that, to shift the way cancer treatment is delivered and give a drug that is specifically targeted to the individual patient’s cancer.”

POG begins by sequencing a patient’s entire genome to create a virtual library of detailed information about every aspect of their cancer.

A team of more than 60 experts then collaborate to analyze and interpret this data and customize treatments for the individual that will be most likely to achieve success.

Because each treatment plan is uniquely designed for the patient, POG has the potential to replace invasive therapies such as chemotherapy and radiation in favour of less harmful drugs.

Key Facts

• In less than two years, POG proved it is possible to sequence, analyze and pinpoint abnormalities in patients’ genomes—all within a clinically-relevant timeframe.

• Based on results, POG was expanded to 5,000 participants, including many in Kelowna.

• Roughly 75 per cent of oncologists in B.C. are currently trained on POG.

 

Just Posted

Petition filed to supreme court on Peachtree Village

A petition was filed Wednesday by the Friends of Beach Avenue Association

Giving Tuesday will be celebrated in Vernon on Nov.28

Giving Tuesday Okanagan mobilizes to celebrate the global day of giving November 28

Lake Country plan recommends to save for emergencies

The financial plan will be presented to council Tuesday

Kelowna pot dispensary launches petition

One of the medical marijuana dispensaries being sued by the City of Kelowna is fighting back

Summerland mayor receives dead rats

Two rodents have been delivered to Peter Waterman’s doorstep

What’s happening

Find out what is going on this weekend in the Okanagan and Shuswap

Kelowna company offering calibration service cameras

Speedy Glass has been selected as one of 50 service centres

Big White has wet opening day

The resort only opened four out of 19 lifts

False killer whale ‘Chester’ dies at Vancouver Aquarium

He was found stranded near Tofino in July 2014 and only had a 10 per cent chance of making it at the time

Elves in search of their clothes

Eight costumes missing from Summerland Legion

Christmas dinner in West Kelowna

It is being held at Westbank Lions Community Centre, 2466 Main Street, West Kelowna, at 5:30 p.m.

Cougar confronts man in Clearwater

Clearwater resident Barry Joneson had a close encounter of the cougar kind

Letter: Closing pot shops not in public interest

Letter writer says the public is not being served by Kelowna, West Kelowna going after pot shops

Most Read